Unwise attention: ayoniso manasikāra

ayoniso manasikāra: inappropiate attention, unwise reflection.

The most substantial characterization of ayoniso manasikāra is provided in the Sabbāsavā Sutta:

MN 2

“so evaṃ ayoniso manasi karoti: ‘ahosiṃ nu kho ahaṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? na nu kho ahosiṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? kiṃ nu kho ahosiṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? kathaṃ nu kho ahosiṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? kiṃ hutvā kiṃ ahosiṃ nu kho ahaṃ atītamaddhānaṃ? bhavissāmi nu kho ahaṃ anāgatamaddhānaṃ? na nu kho bhavissāmi anāgatamaddhānaṃ? kiṃ nu kho bhavissāmi anāgatamaddhānaṃ? kathaṃ nu kho bhavissāmi anāgatamaddhānaṃ? kiṃ hutvā kiṃ bhavissāmi nu kho ahaṃ anāgatamaddhānan’ti? etarahi vā paccuppannamaddhānaṃ ajjhattaṃ kathaṃkathī hoti: ‘ahaṃ nu khosmi? no nu khosmi? kiṃ nu khosmi? kathaṃ nu khosmi? ayaṃ nu kho satto kuto āgato? so kuhiṃ gāmī bhavissatī’ti? This is how he attends inappropriately: ‘Was I in the past? Was I not in the past? What was I in the past? How was I in the past? Having been what, what was I in the past? Shall I be in the future? Shall I not be in the future? What shall I be in the future? How shall I be in the future? Having been what, what shall I be in the future?’ Or else he is inwardly perplexed about the immediate present: ‘Am I? Am I not? What am I? How am I? Where has this being come from? Where is it bound?’
“tassa evaṃ ayoniso manasikaroto channaṃ diṭṭhīnaṃ aññatarā diṭṭhi uppajjati. ‘atthi me attā’ti vā assa saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; ‘natthi me attā’ti vā assa saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; ‘attanāva attānaṃ sañjānāmī’ti vā assa saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; ‘attanāva anattānaṃ sañjānāmī’ti vā assa saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; ‘anattanāva attānaṃ sañjānāmī’ti vā assa saccato thetato diṭṭhi uppajjati; atha vā panassa evaṃ diṭṭhi hoti: ‘yo me ayaṃ attā vado vedeyyo tatra tatra kalyāṇapāpakānaṃ kammānaṃ vipākaṃ paṭisaṃvedeti so kho pana me ayaṃ attā nicco dhuvo sassato avipariṇāmadhammo sassatisamaṃ tatheva ṭhassatī’ti. idaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, diṭṭhigataṃ diṭṭhigahanaṃ diṭṭhikantāraṃ diṭṭhivisūkaṃ diṭṭhivipphanditaṃ diṭṭhisaṃyojanaṃ. diṭṭhisaṃyojanasaṃyutto, bhikkhave, assutavā puthujjano na parimuccati jātiyā jarāya maraṇena sokehi paridevehi dukkhehi domanassehi upāyāsehi; ‘na parimuccati dukkhasmā’ti vadāmi. As he attends inappropriately in this way, one of six kinds of view arises in him: The view I have a self arises in him as true & established, or the view I have no self… or the view It is precisely by means of self that I perceive self… or the view It is precisely by means of self that I perceive not-self… or the view It is precisely by means of not-self that I perceive self arises in him as true & established, or else he has a view like this: This very self of mine — the knower that is sensitive here & there to the ripening of good & bad actions — is the self of mine that is constant, everlasting, eternal, not subject to change, and will stay just as it is for eternity. This is called a thicket of views, a wilderness of views, a contortion of views, a writhing of views, a fetter of views. Bound by a fetter of views, the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person is not freed from birth, aging, & death, from sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair. He is not freed, I tell you, from suffering & stress.

According to the commentary, ayoniso manasikāra is attention or reflection that constitutes the wrong means or the wrong track (uppatha), that is contrary to the truth, as for example, in line with the vipallāsas: attention to the impermanent as permanent, the unpleasant as pleasant, what is not self as self, and what is foul as beautiful.

The Ayonisomanasikāra Sutta also provides a connection with the wrong type of vitakkas:

SN 9.11

ekaṃ samayaṃ aññataro bhikkhu kosalesu viharati aññatarasmiṃ vanasaṇḍe. tena kho pana samayena so bhikkhu divāvihāragato pāpake akusale vitakke vitakketi, seyyathidaṃ kāmavitakkaṃ, byāpādavitakkaṃ, vihiṃsāvitakkaṃ. atha kho yā tasmiṃ vanasaṇḍe adhivatthā devatā tassa bhikkhuno anukampikā atthakāmā taṃ bhikkhuṃ saṃvejetukāmā yena so bhikkhu tenupasaṅkami; upasaṅkamitvā taṃ bhikkhuṃ gāthāhi ajjhabhāsi On one occasion a certain monk was dwelling among the Kosalans in a forest thicket. Now at that time, he spent the day’s abiding thinking evil, unskillful thoughts: i.e., thoughts of sensuality, thoughts of ill will, thoughts of doing harm. Then the devata inhabiting the forest thicket, feeling sympathy for the monk, desiring his benefit, desiring to bring him to his senses, approached him and addressed him with this verse:
“ayoniso manasikārā, so vitakkehi khajjasi. From inappropriate attention, you’re being chewed by your thoughts.

At AN 5.151, ayoniso manasikāra is juxtaposed with an·ekagga·citta (see ekagga·tā for an antonym) in one single item as an attitude preventing one who listens to the Dhamma from realizing it.

Ayoniso manasikāra prevents wholesome states from arising:

The seven bojjhaṅgas:

AN 1.74

“nāhaṃ, bhikkhave, aññaṃ ekadhammampi samanupassāmi yena anuppannā vā bojjhaṅgā nuppajjanti uppannā vā bojjhaṅgā na bhāvanāpāripūriṃ gacchanti yathayidaṃ, bhikkhave, ayonisomanasikāro. Bhikkhus, I do not see any other thing because of which unarisen factors of awakening do not arise and arisen factors of enlightenment do not go to their completion through development so much as inappropriate attention.

Sati·sampajañña:

AN 10.61

asatāsampajaññampāhaṃ, bhikkhave, sāhāraṃ vadāmi, no anāhāraṃ. ko cāhāro asatāsampajaññassa? ‘ayonisomanasikāro’’tissa vacanīyaṃ. Lack of mindfulness and clear comprehension, too, I say, has a nutriment; it is not without nutriment. And what is the nutriment for lack of mindfulness and clear comprehension? It should be said: careless attention.

Ayoniso manasikāra also gives rise to other akusala dhammas:

AN 1.66

“nāhaṃ, bhikkhave, aññaṃ ekadhammampi samanupassāmi yena anuppannā vā akusalā dhammā uppajjanti uppannā vā kusalā dhammā parihāyanti yathayidaṃ, bhikkhave, ayonisomanasikāro. Bhikkhus, I do not see any other thing because of which unarisen unwholesome states arise and arisen wholesome states decline, so much as inappropriate attention.

In particular, in conjunction with other phenomena, it gives rise to the five nīvaraṇas:

SN 46.51

ko ca, bhikkhave, āhāro anuppannassa vā kāmacchandassa uppādāya, uppannassa vā kāmacchandassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya? atthi, bhikkhave, subhanimittaṃ. tattha ayonisomanasikārabahulīkāro: ayamāhāro anuppannassa vā kāmacchandassa uppādāya, uppannassa vā kāmacchandassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya. And what is the food for the arising of unarisen sensual desire, or for the growth & increase of sensual desire once it has arisen? There is the theme of beauty. To foster inappropriate attention to it: This is the food for the arising of unarisen sensual desire, or for the growth & increase of sensual desire once it has arisen.
“ko ca, bhikkhave, āhāro anuppannassa vā byāpādassa uppādāya, uppannassa vā byāpādassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya? atthi, bhikkhave, paṭighanimittaṃ. tattha ayonisomanasikārabahulīkāro: ayamāhāro anuppannassa vā byāpādassa uppādāya, uppannassa vā byāpādassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya. And what is the food for the arising of unarisen ill will, or for the growth & increase of ill will once it has arisen? There is the theme of resistance. To foster inappropriate attention to it: This is the food for the arising of unarisen ill will, or for the growth & increase of ill will once it has arisen.
“ko ca, bhikkhave, āhāro anuppannassa vā thinamiddhassa uppādāya, uppannassa vā thinamiddhassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya? atthi, bhikkhave, arati tandi vijambhitā bhattasammado cetaso ca līnattaṃ. tattha ayonisomanasikārabahulīkāro: ayamāhāro anuppannassa vā thinamiddhassa uppādāya, uppannassa vā thinamiddhassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya. And what is the food for the arising of unarisen sloth & drowsiness, or for the growth & increase of sloth & drowsiness once it has arisen? There are boredom, weariness, yawning, drowsiness after a meal, & sluggishness of awareness. To foster inappropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen sloth & drowsiness, or for the growth & increase of sloth & drowsiness once it has arisen.
“ko ca, bhikkhave, āhāro anuppannassa vā uddhaccakukkuccassa uppādāya, uppannassa vā uddhaccakukkuccassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya? atthi, bhikkhave, cetaso avūpasamo. tattha ayonisomanasikārabahulīkāro: ayamāhāro anuppannassa vā uddhaccakukkuccassa uppādāya, uppannassa vā uddhaccakukkuccassa bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya. And what is the food for the arising of unarisen restlessness & anxiety, or for the growth & increase of restlessness & anxiety once it has arisen? There is non-stillness of awareness. To foster inappropriate attention to that: This is the food for the arising of unarisen restlessness & anxiety, or for the growth & increase of restlessness & anxiety once it has arisen.

When it comes to vicikicchā, ayoniso manasikāra is the cause per se:

AN 1.15

“nāhaṃ, bhikkhave, aññaṃ ekadhammampi samanupassāmi yena anuppannā vā vicikicchā uppajjati uppannā vā vicikicchā bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya saṃvattati yathayidaṃ, bhikkhave, ayonisomanasikāro. Bhikkhus, I do not see any other thing because of which unarisen doubt arises and arisen doubt increases and multiplies, so much as inappropriate attention.

Ayoniso manasikāra is also the direct cause for the arising of micchā·diṭṭhi:

AN 1.302

“nāhaṃ, bhikkhave, aññaṃ ekadhammampi samanupassāmi yena anuppannā vā micchādiṭṭhi uppajjati uppannā vā micchādiṭṭhi pavaḍḍhati yathayidaṃ, bhikkhave, ayonisomanasikāro. Bhikkhus, I do not see any other thing because of which unarisen wrong view arises and arisen wrong view increases and multiplies, so much as inappropriate attention.

It generally leads to ‘great harm’ (mahato anatthāya):

AN 1.90

“nāhaṃ, bhikkhave, aññaṃ ekadhammampi samanupassāmi yo evaṃ mahato anatthāya saṃvattati yathayidaṃ, bhikkhave, ayoniso manasikāro. Bhikkhus, I do not see any other thing that leads to such great harm, so much as inappropriate attention.

It leads particularly to the disappearance of the Dhamma (saddhammassa sammosāya antaradhānāya)

AN 1.122

“nāhaṃ, bhikkhave, aññaṃ ekadhammampi samanupassāmi yo evaṃ saddhammassa sammosāya antaradhānāya saṃvattati yathayidaṃ, bhikkhave, ayonisomanasikāro. Bhikkhus, I do not see any other thing that leads to the decline and disappearance of the good Dhamma, so much as inappropriate attention.

According to AN 10.76, ayoniso manasikāra rests particularly on three phenomena: forgetfulness (muṭṭhasacca), lack of sampajañña, and mental unrest (cetaso vikkhepa).

La noble voie à huit composantes: ce que les souttas nous en disent

Note: vous trouverez cet article dans son environnement originel ici.

ariya aṭṭhaṅgika magga: [ariya aṭṭha+aṅga+ika magga]

noble voie à huit composantes.

L’expression, ainsi que chacune de ses composantes (aṅgā), sont expliquées en détail à SN 45.8:

1. sammā·diṭṭhi

2. sammā·saṅkappa

3. sammā·vācā

4. sammā·kammanta

5. sammā·ājīva

6. sammā·vāyāma

7. sammā·sati

8. sammā·samādhi

♦ L’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga est introduit dans le célèbre Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta comme constituant la Voie du Milieu (majjhimā paṭipadā), c’est à dire la voie évitant à la fois l’hédonisme et la mortification de soi:

SN 56.11

 

Dve·me, bhikkhave, antā pabbajitena na sevitabbā. Katame dve? Yo c·āyaṃ kāmesu kāma·sukh·allik·ānuyogo hīno gammo pothujjaniko an·ariyo an·attha·saṃhito, yo c·āyaṃ attakilamath·ānuyogo dukkho an·ariyo an·attha·saṃhito. Ete kho, bhikkhave, ubho ante an·upagamma majjhimā paṭipadā tathāgatena abhisambuddhā cakkhu·karaṇī ñāṇa·karaṇī upasamāya abhiññāya sambodhāya nibbānāya saṃvattati. Bhikkhous, ces deux extrêmes ne devraient pas être poursuivis par ceux qui ont quitté le foyer. Quels sont ces deux? La poursuite du bien-être sensuel dans la sensualité, qui est inférieure, vulgaire, qui est caractéristique des gens ordinaires, ig·noble et non-bénéfique, et la poursuite de la mortification de soi, qui est douloureuse, ig·noble et non-bénéfique. Évitant ces deux extrêmes, bhikkhous, la voie médiane à laquelle le Tathāgata s’est pleinement éveillé, qui apporte la vision et la connaissance, mène à la paix, à la connaissance directe, à l’éveil complet, à l’Extinction.

 

♦ L’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga est également introduit un peu plus loin dans le même soutta comme constituant la quatrième ariya·sacca:

 

 

Idaṃ kho pana, bhikkhave, dukkha·nirodha·gāminī paṭipadā ariya·saccaṃ: ayam·eva ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo, seyyathidaṃ: sammā·diṭṭhi sammā·saṅkappo sammā·vācā sammā·kammanto sammā·ājīvo sammā·vāyāmo sammā·sati sammā·samādhi. De plus, bhikkhous, voici la noble vérité de la voie menant à la cessation du mal-être: c’est cette noble voie à huit composantes, c’est à dire la vue correcte, l’aspiration correcte, la parole correcte, l’action correcte, le moyen de subsistance correct, l’effort correct, la présence d’esprit correcte, la concentration correcte.

 

♦ Comme il est expliqué ci-dessus à SN 56.11, l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga est ce qui mène à nibbāna. À SN 45.62, il y mène tout comme le fleuve Gange s’incline, s’infléchit et s’écoule vers l’est (seyyathāpi gaṅgā nadī pācīna·ninnā pācīna·poṇā pācīna·pabbhārā). À SN 45.86, la voie est comme un arbre s’inclinant, s’infléchissant et se penchant vers l’est (seyyathāpi rukkho pācīna·ninno pācīna·poṇo pācīna·pabbhāro) et qui ne pourrait tomber que dans cette direction si on le coupait à la racine. C’est également la voie menant à amata (amata·gāmi·maggo, SN 45.7), ou l’inconditionné (a·saṅkhata·gāmi·maggo, SN 43.11).

♦ Un saṃyutta tout entier (SN 45), riche en allégories et explications, est dédié à l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga.

♦ Différentes désignations sont données à l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga. À MN 19, il est appelé ‘La voie paisible et sûre qui est à suivre gaiement/avec exaltation’ (khemo maggo sovatthiko pīti·gamanīyo). Il est souvent assimilé à la brahmacariya (e.g. SN 45.6), à l’ascétisme (sāmañña) comme à SN 45.35, ou au statut de brahmane (brahmañña) comme à SN 45.36. À SN 12.65, c’est une voie ancienne, l’ancien chemin arpenté par les sammā·Sambuddhas du passé. À SN 35.191, l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga est comparé à un radeau utilisé pour traverser de l’identité (au soi) jusqu’à ‘l’autre rive’, qui représente nibbāna. À SN 45.4, après qu’Ananda ait vu un brahmane sur un char luxueux et l’ait appelé un ‘véhicule brahmique’ (brahma·yāna), le Bouddha lui dit que c’est en fait une expression plus appropriée à l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga, aux côtés du ‘véhicule du Dhamma’ (dhamma·yāna), et la ‘suprême victoire dans la bataille’ (anuttara saṅgāma·vijaya). L’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga est aussi appelé correctitude (sammatta, SN 45.21), kusalā dhammā (SN 45.22), la voie correcte (sammā·paṭipada, SN 45.23), et la pratique correcte (sammā·paṭipatti, SN 45.31).

♦ L’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga fait partie d’un ensemble de 37 dhammas qui sont parfois mentionnés tous ensemble (e.g. à AN 10.90, SN 22.81). Ils sont parfois appelés bodhipakkhiyā dhammā, bien que cette expression n’ait pas de définition stricte dans les souttas et soit également utilisée pour décrire d’autres ensembles. Il est dit à SN 45.155 que l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga développe ces bodhi·pakkhiya·dhammā.

♦ Il est dit que chaque composante (aṅga) de la voie mène à la suivante:

AN 10.103

 

“sammattaṃ, bhikkhave, āgamma ārādhanā hoti, no virādhanā. kathañca, bhikkhave, sammattaṃ āgamma ārādhanā hoti, no virādhanā? sammādiṭṭhikassa, bhikkhave, sammāsaṅkappo pahoti, sammāsaṅkappassa sammāvācā pahoti, sammāvācassa sammākammanto pahoti, sammākammantassa sammāājīvo pahoti, sammāājīvassa sammāvāyāmo pahoti, sammāvāyāmassa sammāsati pahoti, sammāsatissa sammāsamādhi pahoti. En venant à la correctitude, bhikkhous, il y a succès et non pas échec. Et comment est-ce, bhikkhous, qu’en venant à la correctitude, il y a succès et non pas échec? Chez celui qui a la vue correcte, l’aspiration correcte apparaît. Chez celui qui a l’aspiration correcte, la parole correcte apparaît. Chez celui qui a la parole correcte, l’action correcte apparaît. Chez celui qui a l’action correcte, le moyen de subsistence correct apparaît. Chez celui qui a le moyen de subsistence correct, l’effort correct apparaît. Chez celui qui a l’effort correct, la présence d’esprit correcte apparaît. Chez celui qui a la présence d’esprit correcte, la concentration correcte apparaît.

 

On trouve notamment une progression de ce type à SN 45.1. AN 7.45 déclare quant à lui que les sept autres composantes de la voie sont les ‘supports’ (upanisa) et les ‘équipements’ (parikkhāra) de sammā·samādhi. MN 117 explique plus en détail comment ces facteurs interagissent, selon le schéma suivant:

MN 117

 

“tatra, bhikkhave, sammādiṭṭhi pubbaṅgamā hoti. kathañca, bhikkhave, sammādiṭṭhi pubbaṅgamā hoti? micchāsaṅkappaṃ ‘micchāsaṅkappo’ti pajānāti, sammāsaṅkappaṃ ‘sammāsaṅkappo’ti pajānāti, sāssa hoti sammādiṭṭhi. En ceci, bhikkhous, la vue correcte est le précurseur. Et comment, bhikkhous, la vue correcte est-elle le précurseur? Il discerne une aspiration erronée comme étant une aspiration erronée, et il discerne une aspiration correcte comme étant une aspiration correcte: c’est sa vue correcte.
so micchāsaṅkappassa pahānāya vāyamati, sammāsaṅkappassa upasampadāya, svāssa hoti sammāvāyāmo. so sato micchāsaṅkappaṃ pajahati, sato sammāsaṅkappaṃ upasampajja viharati; sāssa hoti sammāsati. itiyime tayo dhammā sammāsaṅkappaṃ anuparidhāvanti anuparivattanti, seyyathidaṃ sammādiṭṭhi, sammāvāyāmo, sammāsati. Il s’efforce d’abandonner l’aspiration erronée et d’acquérir l’aspiration correcte: c’est son effort correct. Il abandonne l’aspiration erronée en étant présent d’esprit et il acquiert l’aspiration correcte en étant présent d’esprit: c’est sa présence d’esprit correcte. Ainsi, ces trois qualités tournent et gravitent autour de l’aspiration correcte, c’est à dire la vue correcte, l’effort correct et la présence d’esprit correcte.

 

 

♦ L’énumération des composantes de la voie est parfois ponctuée par quatre formules différentes. On trouve un exemple de la première à SN 45.2. Elle est en fait souvent utilisée pour illustrer les bojjhaṅgas, et occasionnellement avec les indriyas (spirituelles) ou les balas: ‘basée sur l’isolement, sur le détachement, sur la cessation, se parachevant dans le lâcher-prise’ (viveka·nissita virāga·nissita nirodha·nissita vossagga·pariṇāmi).

La deuxième formule se trouve par exemple à SN 45.4: ‘qui a pour objectif final l’élimination de l’avidité, qui a pour objectif final l’élimination de l’aversion, qui a pour objectif final l’élimination de l’illusionnement’ (rāga·vinaya·pariyosāna dosa·vinaya·pariyosāna moha·vinaya·pariyosāna).

La troisième se trouve par exemple à SN 45.115: ‘qui a le Sans-mort pour fondation, qui a le Sans-mort pour destination, qui a le Sans-mort pour objectif final’ (amat·ogadha amata·parāyana amata·pariyosāna).

La quatrième se trouve par exemple à SN 45.91: ‘qui s’incline vers Nibbāna, qui descend vers Nibbāna, qui coule vers Nibbāna‘ (nibbāna·ninna nibbāna·poṇa nibbāna·pabbhāra).

♦ L’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga, s’il n’est pas présent, n’apparaît pas sans un Bouddha (n·āññatra tathāgatassa pātubhāvā arahato sammāsambuddhassa, SN 45.14) ou la Discipline d’un Sublime (n·āññatra sugata·vinaya, SN 45.15).

♦ À SN 55.5, l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga est ce qui définit sotāpatti, puisque sota (le courant) n’est autre que l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga, et un sotāpanna est celui qui le possède:

SN 55.5

 

— “‘soto, soto’ti hidaṃ, sāriputta, vuccati. katamo nu kho, sāriputta, soto”ti? — Sāripoutta, on entend dire: ‘Le courant, le courant’. Qu’est-ce donc, Sāripoutta, que le courant?
— “ayameva hi, bhante, ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo soto — Le courant n’est autre que cette noble voie à huit composantes, Bhanté
— “‘sotāpanno, sotāpanno’ti hidaṃ, sāriputta, vuccati. katamo nu kho, sāriputta, sotāpanno”ti? — Sāripoutta, on entend dire: ‘Quelqu’un qui est entré dans le courant, quelqu’un qui est entré dans le courant’. Qui donc, Sāripoutta, est celui qui est entré dans le courant?
— “yo hi, bhante, iminā ariyena aṭṭhaṅgikena maggena samannāgato ayaṃ vuccati sotāpanno — Quiconque, Bhanté, est doué de cette noble voie à huit composantes, est appelé quelqu’un qui est entré dans le courant

 

 

♦ À MN 126, les 8 composantes de l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga sont présentées comme une technologie de l’esprit (‘une technique appropriée pour obtenir un résultat’: yoni hesā phalassa adhigamāya) dont les résultats ne dépendent pas du fait qu’on formule des souhaits ou des prières, mais qui au contraire se base uniquement sur les lois de la nature, ce qui est illustré métaphoriquement par la manière dont on obtient de l’huile de sésame en utilisant une technique appropriée (presser les graines arrosées d’eau), par la manière dont on obtient du lait (par traite d’une vache ayant récemment mis bas), du beurre (en barattant de la crème), ou du feu (en frottant un bout de bois sec, sans sève avec un bâton à feu approprié).

♦ À AN 4.237, les huit composantes de l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga constituent ‘kamma qui n’est ni sombre ni lumineux, avec des résultats ni sombres ni lumineux, qui mène à la destruction du kamma(kammaṃ a·kaṇhā·sukkaṃ a·kaṇhā·sukka·vipākaṃ, kamma·kkhayāya saṃvattati).

♦ L’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga est régulièrement augmenté pour former un ensemble à dix composantes, avec l’addition de sammā·ñāṇa et sammā·vimutti. SN 45.26 semble indiquer que ces deux composantes ne sont applicables qu’aux arahants, puisqu’elles constituent ce qui fait la différence entre un sappurisa et quelqu’un qui est meilleur qu’un sappurisa (sappurisena sappurisataro).

♦ Dix phénomènes sont présentés comme précurseurs de l’apparition de l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga, les sept premiers selon l’allégorie suivante:

 

sūriyassa, bhikkhave, udayato etaṃ pubbaṅgamaṃ etaṃ pubbanimittaṃ, yadidaṃ, aruṇuggaṃ; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno ariyassa aṭṭhaṅgikassa maggassa uppādāya etaṃ pubbaṅgamaṃ etaṃ pubbanimmittaṃ… Voici, bhikkhous, quel est le précurseur et le signe avant-coureur du lever du soleil, c’est-à-dire l’aurore. De la même manière, pour un bhikkhou, voici quel est le précurseur et le signe avant-coureur de l’apparition de la noble voie à huit composantes…

 

Dans chaque cas, il est dit que lorsqu’un bhikkhou satisfait la condition, ‘on peut s’attendre à ce qu’il cultive la noble voie à huit composantes, à ce qu’il pratique fréquemment la noble voie à huit composantes (pāṭikaṅkhaṃ ariyaṃ aṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ bhāvessati, ariyaṃ aṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ bahulīkarissati):

1. Kalyāṇa·mittatā est le précurseur de l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga le plus souvent mentionné (en conjonction avec l’allégorie ci-dessus à SN 45.49). Il est même déclaré à SN 45.2 qu’elle représente en fait la brahmacariya toute entière (sakalam·ev·idaṃ brahmacariyaṃ), puisqu’on peut s’attendre à ce que celui qui développe la première pratiquera l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga, d’autant plus que, comme nous l’avons vu précédemment (e.g. à SN 45.6), la brahmacariya est également définie comme étant l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga lui-même.

On trouve également une formule qui rappelle les souttas qui se trouvent dans AN 1:

SN 45.77

 

nāhaṃ, bhikkhave, aññaṃ ekadhammampi samanupassāmi, yena anuppanno vā ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo uppajjati, uppanno vā ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo bhāvanāpāripūriṃ gacchati, yathayidaṃ, bhikkhave, kalyāṇamittatā. Je ne vois aucune autre chose, bhikkhous, à cause de laquelle la noble voie à huit composantes qui n’était pas apparue vient à apparaître, ou la noble voie à huit composantes qui était apparue augmente et va à sa plénitude, autant qu’à cause d’une amitié bénéfique.

 

2. Sīla est également mentionnée plusieurs fois comme précurseur de l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga indépendamment de l’allégorie du lever de soleil (dans le contexte duquel elle est introduite à SN 45.50 comme l’accomplissement en vertu (sīla·sampadā)). Parmi ces exemples, on trouve les suivants:

SN 45.149

 

seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, ye keci balakaraṇīyā kammantā karīyanti, sabbe te pathaviṃ nissāya pathaviyaṃ patiṭṭhāya evamete balakaraṇīyā kammantā karīyanti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sīlaṃ nissāya sīle patiṭṭhāya ariyaṃ aṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ bhāveti ariyaṃ aṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ bahulīkaroti. Tout comme, bhikkhous, toutes les actions devant être réalisées par la force sont réalisées sur la base de la terre, supportées par la terre, de la même manière, c’est sur la base de la vertu, supporté par la vertu qu’un bhikkhou cultive la noble voie à huit composantes, qu’il pratique fréquemment la noble voie à huit composantes.

 

SN 45.150

 

seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, ye kecime bījagāmabhūtagāmā vuḍḍhiṃ virūḷhiṃ vepullaṃ āpajjanti, sabbe te pathaviṃ nissāya pathaviyaṃ patiṭṭhāya evamete bījagāmabhūtagāmā vuḍḍhiṃ virūḷhiṃ vepullaṃ āpajjanti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sīlaṃ nissāya sīle patiṭṭhāya ariyaṃ aṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ bhāvento ariyaṃ aṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ bahulīkaronto vuḍḍhiṃ virūḷhiṃ vepullaṃ pāpuṇāti dhammesu. Tout comme, bhikkhous, toutes les graines et les plantes atteignent leur prospérité, leur développement et leur plénitude sur la base de la terre, supportées par la terre, de la même manière, c’est sur la base de la vertu, supporté par la vertu qu’un bhikkhou cultivant la noble voie à huit composantes, pratiquant fréquemment la noble voie à huit composantes, atteint sa prospérité, son développement et sa plénitude dans les états mentaux [avantageux].

 

3. Appamāda est également mentionnée plusieurs fois comme précurseur de l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga indépendamment de l’allégorie du lever de soleil (dans le contexte de laquelle elle est introduite à SN 45.54 comme l’accomplissement en assiduité (appamāda·sampadā)). On trouve de tels exemples à SN 45.139 et SN 45.140.

4. Sammā·diṭṭhi (AN 10.121) ou l’accomplissement dans le domaines des vues (diṭṭhi·sampadā, SN 45.53), sont mentionnés avec l’allégorie du lever de soleil comme constituant des précurseurs de la voie, ce qui n’est pas surprenant, puisque comme nous l’avons vu plus haut, chaque composante de la voie mène à la suivante, et sammā·diṭṭhi est toujours mentionnée en premier.

5. L’accomplissement en désir (chanda·sampadā) est mentionné comme précurseur de l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga dans le contexte de l’allégorie du lever de soleil à SN 45.51. Le commentaire explique le terme comme s’agissant d’un désir pour les kusalā dhammā. Le mot chanda apparaît avec une connotation semblable dans la formule standard décrivant sammā·vāyāma.

6. L’accomplissement par rapport au Soi (atta·sampadā) est mentionné comme précurseur de l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga dans le contexte de l’allégorie du lever de soleil à SN 45.52. Le commentaire explique l’expression comme étant synonyme de sampanna·citta·tā (accomplissement en esprit), lequel suggère l’atteinte de samādhi (voir adhi·citta·sikkhā). L’expression ‘atta·ññū hoti’ (se connaît lui-même) pourrait aussi expliquer le terme. À SN 7.68, il expliqué comme le fait de savoir que l’on a saddhā, sīla, connaissance/érudition (suta), cāga, paññā et compréhension (paṭibhāna).

7. L’accomplissement en considération à bon escient (yoniso·manasikāra-sampadā) est mentionné comme précurseur de l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga dans le contexte de l’allégorie du lever de soleil à SN 45.52.

8, 9 & 10. Vijjā suivi de hiri et ottappa (anva·d·eva hir·ottappa) sont déclarés être les précurseurs (pubb·aṅgama) de l’entrée dans les kusalā dhammā (kusalānaṃ dhammānaṃ samāpatti) à SN 45.1 et AN 10.105.

♦ Il est dit à AN 4.34 que l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga est le plus élevé (agga) des saṅkhatā dhammā et qu’il apporte les plus élevés des vipākā.

♦ Comme nous l’avons vu plus haut, à SN 56.11, l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga produit ñāṇa·dassana et mène à upasama, sambodhi et Nibbāna. Entre SN 45.161 et SN 45.180, il est aussi déclaré qu’il mène à abhiññā, à la compréhension complète (pariññā), à la destruction complète (parikkhaya), et l’abandon (pahāna) de divers phénomènes: les trois discriminations (vidhā), i.e. ‘Je suis supérieur’ (‘seyyo·ham·asmī’ti), ‘Je suis égal’ (‘sadiso·ham·asmī’ti), ‘Je suis inférieur’ (hīno·ham·asmī’ti); les trois quêtes (esanā), i.e. la quête de sensualité (kām·esanā), la quête d'[une bonne] existence (bhav·esanā), la quête d’une vie brahmique (brahmacariy·esanā); les trois āsavās; les trois bhavās; les trois souffrances (dukkhatā), i.e. la souffrance causée par la douleur (dukkha·dukkhatā), la souffrance causée par les Constructions (saṅkhāra·dukkhatā), la souffrance causée par le changement (vipariṇāma·dukkhatā); les trois akusalamulās; les trois types de vedanā; kāma, diṭṭhi et avijjā; les quatre upādānās; abhijjhā, byāpāda, sīla·bbata parāmāsa et l’adhérence à [la vue] ‘Ceci [seulement] est la vérité’ (idaṃ·sacc·ābhinivesa); les sept anusayās; les cinq kāma·guṇās; les cinq nīvaraṇās; les cinq upādāna·kkhandhas; et les dix saṃyojanās.

♦ L’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga mène également à la cessation (nirodha) des phénomènes: MN 9 mentionne les douze liens de paṭicca·samuppāda, les quatre āhārās et les trois āsavās; AN 6.63 mentionne de plus la cessation de kāma et kamma; SN 22.56 mentionne la cessation de chacun des cinq upādāna·kkhandhas.

♦ L’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga est l’outil qui élimine les akusalā dhammā. MN 3 mentionne explicitement les 16 upakkilesās (avec dosa à la place de byāpāda). On trouve dans le Magga Saṃyutta un certain nombre d’allégories illustrant ce point: à SN 45.153, les akusalā dhammā sont abandonnés par l’esprit comme un bol retourné ‘abandonne’ son eau; à SN 45.156, ils sont désintégrés comme un nuage de pluie désintègre une tempête de poussière; à SN 45.157, ils sont dispersés comme un vent puissant disperse un grand nuage de pluie; à SN 45.158, ils sont comme des cordes sur un navire qui pourrissent sous l’effet de climats incléments.

♦ L’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga donne de la force à l’esprit, comme l’allégorie de SN 45.27 l’explique: la voie y est comparée au pied (double cône dont l’un est inversé) d’un bol (rond), qui fait en sorte que ce dernier ne soit que difficilement renversé. À SN 45.160, les gens, qu’ils soient puissants ou non, qui souhaitent convaincre un bhikkhou cultivant l’ariya aṭṭh·aṅg·ika magga d’abandonner la vie monacale en lui offrant des richesses n’auront pas plus de succès que ceux qui souhaiteraient changer la direction du Gange, parce que son esprit s’incline à l’isolement.

SN 45.159

 

“seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, āgantukāgāraṃ. tattha puratthimāyapi disāya āgantvā vāsaṃ kappenti, pacchimāyapi disāya āgantvā vāsaṃ kappenti, uttarāyapi disāya āgantvā vāsaṃ kappenti, dakkhiṇāyapi disāya āgantvā vāsaṃ kappenti, khattiyāpi āgantvā vāsaṃ kappenti, brāhmaṇāpi āgantvā vāsaṃ kappenti, vessāpi āgantvā vāsaṃ kappenti, suddāpi āgantvā vāsaṃ kappenti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu ariyaṃ aṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ bhāvento ariyaṃ aṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ bahulīkaronto ye dhammā abhiññā pariññeyyā, te dhamme abhiññā parijānāti, ye dhammā abhiññā pahātabbā, te dhamme abhiññā pajahati, ye dhammā abhiññā sacchikātabbā, te dhamme abhiññā sacchikaroti, ye dhammā abhiññā bhāvetabbā, te dhamme abhiññā bhāveti. C’est tout comme, bhikkhous, [dans] une maison de passage. Des [visiteurs venant] de l’ouest viennent y séjourner, des [visiteurs venant] de l’est viennent y séjourner, des [visiteurs venant] du nord viennent y séjourner, des [visiteurs venant] du sud viennent y séjourner. Des aristocrates viennent y séjourner, des brahmanes viennent y séjourner, des vessas viennent y séjourner, des sūdra viennent y séjourner. De la même manière, bhikkhous, lorsqu’un bhikkhou cultive la noble voie à huit composantes, qu’il pratique fréquemment la noble voie à huit composantes, il comprend complètement par compréhension directe les états mentaux devant être compris complètement par compréhension directe, il abandonne par compréhension directe les états mentaux devant être abandonnés par compréhension directe, il atteint par compréhension directe les états mentaux devant être atteints par compréhension directe, il cultive par compréhension directe les états mentaux devant être cultivés par compréhension directe.
“katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā pariññeyyā? pañcupādānakkhandhātissa vacanīyaṃ… Et quels sont, bhikkhous, les états mentaux devant être compris complètement par compréhension directe? Les cinq accumulations d’attachement, devrait-on dire…
katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā pahātabbā? avijjā ca bhavataṇhā ca… Et quels sont, bhikkhous, les états mentaux devant être abandonnés par compréhension directe? L’ignorance et l’appétence pour l’existence…
katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā sacchikātabbā? vijjā ca vimutti ca… Et quels sont, bhikkhous, les états mentaux devant être atteints par compréhension directe? La connaissance correcte et la libération…
katame ca, bhikkhave, dhammā abhiññā bhāvetabbā? samatho ca vipassanā ca. Et quels sont, bhikkhous, les états mentaux devant être cultivés par compréhension directe? La tranquillité et la vision discernante.

 

 

Why vitakka might mean ‘thinking’ in jhana

This article is set to be a comment on Bhante Sujato’s article Why vitakka doesn’t mean ‘thinking’ in jhana. I mean no disrespect to the author. I will simply explain why I have found the arguments presented in that article unconvincing.

The title of Bhante’s article is quite self-explanatory. Nonetheless, his introduction is worth quoting:

« Here’s one of the most often contested issues in Buddhist meditation: can you be thinking while in jhana? We normally think of jhana as a profound state of higher consciousness; yet the standard formula for first jhana says it is a state with ‘vitakka and vicara’. Normally these words mean ‘thinking’ and ‘exploring’, and that is how Bhikkhu Bodhi translates them in jhana, too. This has lead many meditators to believe that in the first jhana one can still be thinking. This is a mistake, and here’s why. »

Then, Bhante explains why he will first present general arguments that in his opinion prove his point:

« Actually, right now I’m interested in a somewhat subtle linguistic approach to this question. But I’ve found that if you use a complex analysis of a problem, some people, understandably enough, don’t have time or interest to follow it through; and often we tend to assume that if a complex argument is just a sign of sophistry and lack of real evidence. So first up I’ll present the more straightforward reasons why vitakka/vicara don’t mean thinking in jhana, based on the texts and on experience. Then I’ll get into the more subtle question of why this mistake gets made.

For most of this article I’ll just mention vitakka, and you can assume that the analysis for vicara follows similar lines. »

Bhante then turns to what he considers as evidence from the suttas:

MN 19

« The primary source work is the Dvedhavitakka Sutta (MN 19). This is where the Buddha talks in most detail about vitakka specifically, and describes how he discovered and developed it as part of the ‘right thought’ (sammasankappa) of the eightfold path. Note that the terms sankappa and vitakka are often, as here, synonyms.

The Buddha describes how he noticed that thinking unwholesome thoughts leads to suffering, while thinking wholesome thoughts leads to happiness. And he further realized that he could think wholesome thoughts nonstop all day and night, which would not lead to anything bad; but by so doing he could not make his mind still in samadhi. So by abandoning even wholesome thoughts he was able to enter on the four jhanas. »

I think it is good to go back directly to the source:

“tassa mayhaṃ, bhikkhave, evaṃ appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato uppajjati nekkhammavitakko… abyāpādavitakko… avihiṃsāvitakko. so evaṃ pajānāmi: ‘uppanno kho me ayaṃ avihiṃsāvitakko. so ca kho nevattabyābādhāya saṃvattati, na parabyābādhāya saṃvattati, na ubhayabyābādhāya saṃvattati, paññāvuddhiko avighātapakkhiko nibbānasaṃvattaniko’. rattiṃ cepi naṃ, bhikkhave, anuvitakkeyyaṃ anuvicāreyyaṃ, neva tatonidānaṃ bhayaṃ samanupassāmi. divasaṃ cepi naṃ, bhikkhave, anuvitakkeyyaṃ anuvicāreyyaṃ, neva tatonidānaṃ bhayaṃ samanupassāmi. rattindivaṃ cepi naṃ, bhikkhave, anuvitakkeyyaṃ anuvicāreyyaṃ, neva tatonidānaṃ bhayaṃ samanupassāmi. api ca kho me aticiraṃ anuvitakkayato anuvicārayato kāyo kilameyya. kāye kilante cittaṃ ūhaññeyya. ūhate citte ārā cittaṃ samādhimhāti. so kho ahaṃ, bhikkhave, ajjhattameva cittaṃ saṇṭhapemi, sannisādemi, ekodiṃ karomi samādahāmi. taṃ kissa hetu? ‘mā me cittaṃ ūhaññī’ti. »

« And as I remained thus heedful, ardent, & resolute, thinking imbued with renunciation… with non-ill will… with harmlessness arose in me. I discerned that ‘Thinking imbued with harmlessness has arisen in me; and that leads neither to my own affliction, nor to the affliction of others, nor to the affliction of both. It fosters discernment, promotes lack of vexation, & leads to Unbinding. If I were to think & ponder in line with that even for a night… even for a day… even for a day & night, I do not envision any danger that would come from it, except that thinking & pondering a long time would tire the body. When the body is tired, the mind is disturbed; and a disturbed mind is far from concentration.’ So I steadied my mind right within, settled, unified, & concentrated it. Why is that? So that my mind would not be disturbed. »

So here is what the sutta says, precisely:

aticiraṃ anuvitakketi anuvicāreti >> kāyo kilamati >> cittaṃ ūhaññati >> ārā cittaṃ samādhimhā
thinking and pondering for a long time >> the body is tired >> the mind is disturbed >> the mind is away/far from concentration

Does this sutta say that thinking has to be stopped before entering the first jhana? Obviously not.

What it does clearly say is this:

  1. Even when the Buddha speaks of concentration, he uses the word ‘vitakka’ and its derivatives (here the verb ‘vitakketi’) in the sense of ‘thinking’.
  2. ‘Thinking’ for « a long time » (aticiraṃ could be more accurately translated by « an excessively [ati-] long time [cira] »), will tire the body and render concentration impossible.

Is this passage compatible with the idea that ‘vitakka’ would mean something else than ‘thinking’ in jhana, and that actually there would be no ‘vitakka’ (in the usual sense of ‘thought’) in jhana? Well, it certainly seems so to some. But then again, ‘vitakka’ is used in its usual sense of ‘thought’ even in the context of samadhi practice, such as in this very passage of MN 19 as well as in the subsequent AN 3.101, and yet in that same context of samadhi practice, there would be no ‘vitakka’ in the sense of ‘thought’. In short, even in the context of samadhi practice we see that ‘vitakka’=’thought’ however in the first jhana we would have ‘vitakka’ but ‘thoughts’ would be absent.

That does not make any sense to me, and as a math teacher I would consider this a gross pedagogic mistake. I am quite convinced from my overall experience with the suttas that the Buddha mastered the art of pedagogy, and therefore I am not inclined to consider he would have made such a confusing mistake.

Now, is this passage incompatible with the idea that ‘vitakka’ could mean ‘thinking’ in the jhana formula? I would dare to say it is not.

As we have noted above, what it says exactly is that « excess » of thinking « for a long time » is detrimental to concentration. That does not mean there cannot be thinking in the first stage of jhana. Let us compare here ‘vitakka’ with the expression ‘āraddha·vīriya’ (aroused energy). MN 19 continues and shows that aroused energy is well compatible with the first jhana, or at least that it leads towards it:

āraddhaṃ kho pana me, bhikkhave, vīriyaṃ ahosi asallīnaṃ, upaṭṭhitā sati asammuṭṭhā, passaddho kāyo asāraddho, samāhitaṃ cittaṃ ekaggaṃ. so kho ahaṃ, bhikkhave, vivicceva kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ pītisukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja vihāsiṃ. »

« Unflagging persistence was aroused in me, and unmuddled mindfulness established. My body was calm & unaroused, my mind concentrated & single. Quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful mental qualities, I entered & remained in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. »

Yet acc·āraddha·vīriya (ati+āraddha+vīriya, excess of energy) is also detrimental to concentration, as MN 128 states:

« accāraddhavīriyaṃ kho me udapādi, accāraddhavīriyādhikaraṇañca pana me samādhi cavi. samādhimhi cute obhāso antaradhāyati dassanañca rūpānaṃ. seyyathāpi, anuruddhā, puriso ubhohi hatthehi vaṭṭakaṃ gāḷhaṃ gaṇheyya: so tattheva patameyya »

« Excess of energy arose in me, and because of excess of energy my concentration fell away. As my composure fell away, the light and the vision of forms disappeared.’ It is as if a man were to seize a quail tightly with both hands: it would die then and there. »

And for that matter, lack of energy (ati-līna·vīriya) is also detrimental to concentration, as MN 128 also indicates:

« atilīnavīriyaṃ kho me udapādi, atilīnavīriyādhikaraṇañca pana me samādhi cavi. samādhimhi cute obhāso antaradhāyati dassanañca rūpānaṃ. seyyathāpi, anuruddhā, puriso vaṭṭakaṃ sithilaṃ gaṇheyya, so tassa hatthato uppateyya »

« Lack of energy arose in me, and because of lack of energy my composure fell away. As my composure fell away, the light and the vision of forms disappeared.’ It is as if a man were to seize a quail loosely: it would fly off from his hands. »

So I would conclude here that this argument based on MN 19 appears unconvincing to me, insofar as saying that excess of something is detrimental to attaining a certain state is not to be conflated with saying that this thing is per se detrimental to attaining that state, and that therefore it could not be present therein. It can very well be one important component of it, that has to be present in a moderate way. Not unlike sugar in a cake.

Now there might be another way in which one might try to say that MN 19 would prove that ‘thinking’ has to be abandoned before entering jhana, but I’ll mention it only quickly because it stands even less to analysis: it would be to consider that MN 19 progresses linearly, in such a way that the states described later are always more refined than the ones described earlier; then, since the sutta speaks first of ending thoughts and only later on of entering jhana, it should mean that the former has to come before the latter in actual practice, and that there could not be ‘thinking’ in jhana.

Such an assumption would obviously be erroneous. Indeed, MN 19 speaks first of absence of disturbance, of stilling thoughts and of concentration:

« thinking & pondering a long time would tire the body. When the body is tired, the mind is disturbed; and a disturbed mind is far from concentration.’ So I steadied my mind right within, settled, unified, & concentrated it. Why is that? So that my mind would not be disturbed. »

But then, in the next paragraph, it goes back to speaking again about thinking:

« Whatever a monk keeps pursuing with his thinking & pondering, that becomes the inclination of his awareness. If a monk keeps pursuing thinking imbued with renunciation, abandoning thinking imbued with sensuality, his mind is bent by that thinking imbued with renunciation. If a monk keeps pursuing thinking imbued with non-ill will, abandoning thinking imbued with ill will, his mind is bent by that thinking imbued with non-ill will. If a monk keeps pursuing thinking imbued with harmlessness, abandoning thinking imbued with harmfulness, his mind is bent by that thinking imbued with harmlessness. »

Which clearly indicates a not-so-linear exposition. And later on, after concluding on its cowherd simile, it goes into the jhana formulas:

« Unflagging persistence was aroused in me, and unmuddled mindfulness established. My body was calm & unaroused, my mind concentrated & single. Quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful mental qualities, I entered & remained in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation etc. »

 

AN 3.101

Let’s now turn to the next argument mentioned in Bhante Sujato’s article:

« A similar situation is described in AN 3.101. There, the Buddha speaks of a meditator who abandons successively more refined forms of thought, until all that is left are ‘thoughts on the Dhamma’ (dhammavitakka). Even these most subtle of thoughts prevent one from realizing the true peace of samadhi, so they must be abandoned.

Clearly, then, the right thought of the eightfold path, even thoughts of the Dhamma itself, must be abandoned before one can enter jhana. »

So, again, it is worth examining what the sutta says, exactly:

santi adhicittamanuyuttassa bhikkhuno majjhimasahagatā upakkilesā: kāmavitakko byāpādavitakko vihiṃsāvitakko. tamenaṃ sacetaso bhikkhu dabbajātiko pajahati vinodeti byantīkaroti anabhāvaṃ gameti. tasmiṃ pahīne tasmiṃ byantīkate santi adhicittamanuyuttassa bhikkhuno sukhumasahagatā upakkilesā: ñātivitakko janapadavitakko anavaññattipaṭisaṃyutto vitakko. tamenaṃ sacetaso bhikkhu dabbajātiko pajahati vinodeti byantīkaroti anabhāvaṃ gameti.

there remain in [a monk intent on heightened mind, (my correction)] the moderate impurities: thoughts of sensuality, [thoughts of] ill will, & [thoughts of] harmfulness. These he abandons, dispels, wipes out of existence. When he is rid of them there remain in [a monk intent on heightened mind] the fine impurities: thoughts of his caste, thoughts of his home district, thoughts related to not wanting to be despised. These he abandons, dispels, wipes out of existence.

tasmiṃ pahīne tasmiṃ byantīkate athāparaṃ dhammavitakkāvasissati. so hoti samādhi na ceva santo na ca paṇīto nappaṭippassaddhaladdho na ekodibhāvādhigato sasaṅkhāraniggayhavāritagato hoti. so, bhikkhave, samayo yaṃ taṃ cittaṃ ajjhattaṃyeva santiṭṭhati sannisīdati ekodi hoti samādhiyati. so hoti samādhi santo paṇīto paṭippassaddhiladdho ekodibhāvādhigato na sasaṅkhāraniggayhavāritagato. yassa yassa ca abhiññā sacchikaraṇīyassa dhammassa cittaṃ abhininnāmeti abhiññā sacchikiriyāya tatra tatreva sakkhibhabbataṃ pāpuṇāti sati satiāyatane. so sace ākaṅkhati: ‘anekavihitaṃ iddhividhaṃ paccanubhaveyyaṃ

« When he is rid of them, there remain only thoughts of the Dhamma. His concentration is neither calm nor refined, it has not yet attained serenity, [not yet reached] unity, and is kept in place by the fabrication of forceful restraint. But there comes a time when his mind grows steady inwardly, settles down, grows unified & concentrated. His concentration is calm & refined, has attained serenity & [reached] unity, and is no longer kept in place by the fabrication of forceful restraint. And then whichever of the higher knowledges he turns his mind to know & realize, he can witness them for himself whenever there is an opening. If he wants, he wields manifold supranormal powers. »

As we can see here, when the meditator is working with « thoughts of the Dhamma » (dhammavitakka), the text speaks of « his concentration, » that is not calm or refined, and that has « not yet reached unity » (ekodibhāva). This word is very telling, because it comes up in the second jhana formula, as one of its characteristics:

« vitakkavicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodibhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhijaṃ pītisukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati. »

« With the stilling of directed thoughts & evaluations, he enters & remains in the second jhana: rapture & pleasure born of composure, unification of awareness free from directed thought & evaluation — internal assurance. » (Ven. Thanissaro)

So the text looks very much like saying that while the meditator is still having « thoughts of the Dhamma » he already has a certain degree of concentration, that is of quite low quality (which we could in all intellectual honesty consider as likely to be the first jhana), but later on he reaches true unification of the mind (quite arguably a code word for second jhana), and then his concentration is of much higher quality. Therefore I see little backup for Bhante’s claim:

« Clearly, then, the right thought of the eightfold path, even thoughts of the Dhamma itself, must be abandoned before one can enter jhana. »

I would even add that this last statement is also clearly at odds with MN 78, which by the way also supports quite strongly the interpretation that takes ekodibhāva in the above AN 3.101 to refer to the attainment of the second jhana:

« Katame ca, thapati, akusalā saṅkappā? Kāma-saṅkappo, byāpāda-saṅkappo, vihiṃsā-saṅkappo. … Ime ca, thapati, akusalā saṅkappā kuhiṃ aparisesā nirujjhanti? Nirodhopi nesaṃ vutto: idha, thapati, bhikkhu vivicceva kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ pītisukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati. etthete akusalā saṅkappā aparisesā nirujjhanti. »

« And what are unskillful resolves? Being resolved on sensuality, on ill will, on harmfulness. These are called unskillful resolves. … Now where do unskillful resolves cease without trace? Their cessation, too, has been stated: There is the case where a monk, quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful mental qualities, enters & remains in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. This is where unskillful resolves cease without trace. »

« Katame ca, thapati, kusalā saṅkappā? Nekkhammasaṅkappo, abyāpādasaṅkappo, avihiṃsāsaṅkappo … Ime ca, thapati, kusalā saṅkappā kuhiṃ aparisesā nirujjhanti? Nirodhopi nesaṃ vutto. Idha, thapati, bhikkhu vitakkavicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodibhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhijaṃ pītisukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati. etthete kusalā saṅkappā aparisesā nirujjhanti.« 

« And what are skillful resolves? Being resolved on renunciation (freedom from sensuality), on non-ill will, on harmlessness. … Now where do skillful resolves cease without trace? Their cessation, too, has been stated: There is the case where a monk, with the stilling of directed thoughts & evaluations, enters & remains in the second jhana: rapture & pleasure born of composure, unification of awareness free from directed thought & evaluation — internal assurance. This is where skillful resolves cease without trace. »

As I have discussed in a previous article, saṅkappa (that Ven Thanissaro here translates as ‘resolves’) can be just synonym of ‘vitakka’ in the sense of ‘thought’, or it can point to something slightly different that I identified as close to ‘aspiration’, a kind of wish that is expressed mentally by a sentence. As I have discussed in a previous article, saṅkappa (that Ven Thanissaro here translates as ‘resolves’) can be just synonym of ‘vitakka’ in the sense of ‘thought’, or it can point to something slightly different that I identified as close to ‘aspiration’, a kind of wish that is expressed mentally by a sentence.

So there are skillful saṅkappas in the first jhana, no one can deny it, but then the only way to keep supporting the opinion according to which there are no ‘thoughts’ in the first jhana would be to consider that ‘saṅkappa’, just as ‘vitakka’, suddenly changes its meaning in the jhana context, a meaning that implies actually the opposite of what it would normally convey, and this without any foreshadowing or explanation anywhere in any sutta. The fact that here saṅkappa can be of renunciation, non-ill will or harmlessness makes it clear that the word in this context means something akin to ‘thought’ and cannot have its meaning twisted as in the case of vitakka to purportedly mean ‘application fo the mind to the meditation object’. Yet it is clearly said to be present up to the second jhana.

It seems to me in all intellectual honesty and trying to shake off any kind of ‘agenda’ that when we look a little closer at the texts of MN 19 and AN 3.101, the claims made by Bhante not only appear to be inaccurate, but the evidence actually points to the opposite direction.

 

The little ‘thought’ experiment

Bhante next seeks to prove his point with a little experiment:

« Let me give you a test. Sit quietly, now, for five minutes. Watch your mind, and notice what happens when you think and when you don’t think.

Okay, done now? What happened? Well, let me guess: most of the time you were thinking of this or that, but occasionally there were spaces of silence. And those spaces of silence were more peaceful. Even this much, even just a few minutes of sitting quietly, and you can experience the peace of a quiet mind. And yet in jhana you’re still thinking? Impossible!

Not to mention jhana, anyone who has been on a meditation retreat will have experienced those blessed moments, sometimes several minutes or longer, when the mind is clear, still, and silent. Not all the hindrances are gone, and not all the jhana factors may be present, yet there is a degree of stillness. »

Here Bhante suggests that anyone who has been on a meditation retreat has experienced moments when the mind is clear, still and silent, while not all hindrances are gone. Well, then, let’s see which hindrance might have been present in a « silent » mind:

  • not craving, because it always arises with a distracting object
  • not aversion, because the mind cannot be clear, still and silent with aversion
  • not doubt, because again it arises with thoughts
  • obviously not agitation and worry
  • that leaves us with lethargy and sleepiness. But then again, the mind would not be « clear ».

Therefore I have some doubt that the experience Bhante is referring to is even possible.

So if I remove the last paragraph, it remains that this argument pretends to demonstrate that reaching a thougtless state is within the reach of anybody who just sits for a few seconds. But as per the author’s own words, these « spaces of silence » are nothing but « occasional », in other words they completely lack stability. They cannot be considered similar to a jhanic state, which is always identified as a stable state, since each of the jhanas is described with the formula « he enters and remains in the xxx jhana » (xxx jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati).

In other words, not thinking for a split second or a few seconds is completely different from not thinking for a few minutes, let alone a few hours. One state would qualify as a jhana, the other not, and using the fact that they could be described at a very short time scale with similar words (though the actual experience would be quite different) to imply that these states are even comparable in terms of general level of practice seems rather unconvincing to me.

 

« The best he had »

Bhante then turns to his main observation:

« If vitakka does not mean thinking, then why did the Buddha use such a misleading word? The answer is simple: it was the best he had. »

I think it is pretty clear that the Buddha did have other words to designate the concept « application/directing of the mind ». Take for example the expressions ‘cittaṃ abhininnāmeti’ (he directs his mind) and ‘cittaṃ abhinīharati’ (he inclines his mind) which appears several dozen times in the four Nikayas, generally referring to supra-normal attainments, as for example in DN 2:

“so evaṃ samāhite citte parisuddhe pariyodāte anaṅgaṇe vigatūpakkilese mudubhūte kammaniye ṭhite āneñjappatte ñāṇadassanāya cittaṃ abhinīharati abhininnāmeti.« 

« With his mind thus concentrated, purified, and bright, unblemished, free from defects, pliant, malleable, steady, and attained to imperturbability, he directs and inclines it to knowledge and vision. »

At SN 47.10, the Buddha recommends directing one’s mind towards a specific meditation object and uses the expression ‘cittaṃ paṇidahitabbaṃ’:

« bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ. tassa kāye kāyānupassino viharato kāyārammaṇo vā uppajjati kāyasmiṃ pariḷāho, cetaso vā līnattaṃ, bahiddhā vā cittaṃ vikkhipati. tenānanda, bhikkhunā kismiñcideva pasādanīye nimitte cittaṃ paṇidahitabbaṃ. tassa kismiñcideva pasādanīye nimitte cittaṃ paṇidahato pāmojjaṃ jāyati. »

« a monk abides contemplating body as body — ardent, fully aware, mindful — leading away the unhappiness that comes from wanting the things of the world. And for one who is abiding contemplating body as body, a bodily object arises, or bodily distress, or mental sluggishness, that scatters his mind outward. Then the monk should direct his mind to some satisfactory image. When the mind is directed to some satisfactory image, happiness is born. »

If in the context of jhana, by saying that ‘vitakka’ is present, the Buddha meant that the mind is directing itself towards the object, while there would be no ‘thoughts’, then he could also have used other much less misleading terms, such as ‘manasikāra’.

So it seems to me there is plenty of evidence to show that the Buddha would have had other much less misleading choices. Which leads us to the conclusion that either he didn’t mean there was no ‘thinking’ in the first jhana, or else he made a rather gross pedagogic mistake that got many of us confused.

 

The linguistic argument

Bhante now tries to convince the reader that not only ‘vitakka’ has a completely different meaning in the context of jhana, but so do all other words in the formulas. This is probably the least convincing argument in this article.

Bhante first says something with which I would mostly agree:

« The Buddha, in what must have been a striking innovation, used only simple, empirical terms to describe jhana and other states of higher consciousness. In common with his typical empiricist approach, this means that he used words that remained as close as possible to their ordinary meanings. He wanted people to understand these states, to refer to their ordinary consciousness, and to see how that can be developed and transformed to become something wonderful. »

But why, then, would the Buddha have used a word that generally means ‘thought’ to describe a thougtless state? If I see the word ‘vitakka’ and I « refer to [my] ordinary consciousness » I would tend to interpret it as ‘thought’.

It seems to me that Bhante’s central idea in this article is this:

« If we look closely at the terms in the jhana formula, then, we find that they are words that have a more coarse physical or psychological meaning in everyday language. They are common words that everyone can understand, and can relate to their own experience. And in every single case, they clearly have a more subtle, abstract, evolved meaning in the context of jhana. »

In other words, the idea is to throw the supposed shift in meaning back on all other words. Let’s see how that works out.

« So, for example, the first word in the formula is viveka. This normally means physical seclusion; going away from others into the forest or a solitary spot. In jhana, however, it refers to a mental seclusion, where the mind turns away from the senses and withdraws into itself. The Pali texts make this distinction clear, as elsewhere they speak of three kinds of seclusion: physical, mental (i.e. the jhanas), and seclusion from all attachments (Awakening). »

Yes, the Pali texts make these distinctions clear. This is not the case with ‘vitakka’. But most importantly, that « mental » meaning given to viveka, unlike the purported ‘vitakka’ meaning, appears elsewhere outside the jhana context, for example at AN 3.94:

“tīṇi kho panimāni, bhikkhave, imasmiṃ dhammavinaye bhikkhuno pavivekāni. katamāni tīṇi? idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sīlavā ca hoti, dussīlyañcassa pahīnaṃ hoti, tena ca vivitto hoti; sammādiṭṭhiko ca hoti, micchādiṭṭhi cassa pahīnā hoti, tāya ca vivitto hoti; khīṇāsavo ca hoti, āsavā cassa pahīnā honti, tehi ca vivitto hoti. »

« In this Dhamma and discipline, bhikkhus, there are these three kinds of solitude for a bhikkhu. What three? Here, a bhikkhu is virtuous; he has abandoned immorality
and remains secluded from it. He holds right view; he has abandoned wrong view and remains secluded from it. He is one whose taints are destroyed; he has abandoned the taints and remains secluded from them. »

The word used here is ‘paviveka’, but the meaning is almost the same as ‘viveka’, and the past participle ‘vivitta’ is exactly the same as ‘vivicceva’ (vivitta+eva) in the first jhana formula. So it is quite clear that ‘vivitta’ doesn’t have in jhana a very special meaning that it wouldn’t have anywhere else, as the claim goes in the case of ‘vitakka’.

Then Bhante goes on in the same fashion with the other words in the formula:

« The next word in the formula is kama. In ordinary language this means the pleasures of life, especially sex, but also food, drink, luxuries, and other pleasures of the senses. In jhana, however, it has a more subtle nuance, referring to the mind that inclines to taking pleasure in any experience through the five senses. »

I have to pass on this one, because I fail to see how the purported meaning in jhana is any different from the meaning in ordinary language, as in both cases « the mind … inclines to taking pleasure in [an] experience through one of the five senses ». Therefore, no special meaning here, even less so a special meaning that would not have been described anywhere else.

« Then there is the word akusala. Normally this means ‘unskilful’, as, for example, someone who is no good at a certain craft. One who is kusala, on the other hand, is clever and adroit. In the jhana formula, however, kusala includes any tendency of the mind that creates suffering. »

The word kusala is used in a great many contexts outside of jhana in that sense. This should actually be an evidence that the claim according to which each word of the formula has a special meaning is false.

« Similarly there is the word dhamma, which is what akusala qualifies. Dhamma in ordinary language has a variety of meanings, such as ‘law’, ‘custom’, and so on. In jhana, however, it takes on a far more subtle meaning, that is, any object, quality, or tendency of the mind. The akusala-dhammas, or ‘unskilful qualities’, especially refer to the five hindrances which must be abandoned before entering jhana. »

Same thing. The word dhamma is used in that sense a great many times outside the jhana context. At this point, the argument should fall flat, in my opinion. But Bhante considers his point made and doubles down:

« Now we can look again at the claim that vitakka must mean thinking in jhana, because that’s what it means in everyday discourse. And I trust that this claim now appears a lot less plausible than it might have earlier. If this is true, then vitakka (& vicara) are the sole exceptions. Every other term in the jhana formula takes everyday words and transforms them, in what the Buddha emphasizes at every turn is a special, exalted, and refined context. Only vitakka is exempt from this, and means exactly the same thing in higher consciousness as it does in lower consciousness. »

From the facts I have mentioned, above, I believe it is quite clear that vitakka would not be the only word having the same meaning inside as outside the jhana formula. It is actually the case with every other word.

I do not pretend to know with certainty what the final word on this issue ought to be. I have simply outlined why I have found this article unconvincing and why I think that with a closer look evidence rather points in the opposite direction.

The meaning of ātāpī and the Buddha’s approach to asceticism

Read this article in its original (and more user-friendly) environment here.

Ātāpī is commonly translated as ardent, diligent, serious in effort, zealous.

The term appears most prominently in the Satipaṭṭhāna formulas:

DN 22

 

bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. a bhikkhu dwells observing body in body, ardent, clearly comprehending, mindful, having given up covetousness and affliction towards the world.

 

It is explicitly defined at SN 16.2 in formulas reminiscent of those describing sammā·vāyāma:

 

“kathañcāvuso, ātāpī hoti? idhāvuso, bhikkhu ‘anuppannā me pāpakā akusalā dhammā uppajjamānā anatthāya saṃvatteyyun’ti ātappaṃ karoti, ‘uppannā me pāpakā akusalā dhammā appahīyamānā anatthāya saṃvatteyyun’ti ātappaṃ karoti, ‘anuppannā me kusalā dhammā anuppajjamānā anatthāya saṃvatteyyun’ti ātappaṃ karoti, ‘uppannā me kusalā dhammā nirujjhamānā anatthāya saṃvatteyyun’ti ātappaṃ karoti. evaṃ kho, āvuso, ātāpī hoti. And how, friend, is one ardent? Here, friend, a bhikkhu exerts ardor [considering]: ‘If unarisen bad, unskillful mental states arise in me, it would lead to [my] misfortune’; he exerts ardor [considering]: ‘If arisen bad, unskillful mental states are not abandoned in me, it would lead to [my] misfortune’; he exerts ardor [considering]: ‘If unarisen skillful mental states do not arise in me, it would lead to [my] misfortune’; he exerts ardor [considering]: ‘If arisen skillful mental states cease in me, this may lead to [my] misfortune.’ Thus, friend, he is ardent.

 

This definition is extended to include the ability to endure extreme dukkha·vedanā at AN 3.50:

 

“yato kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu anuppannānaṃ pāpakānaṃ akusalānaṃ dhammānaṃ anuppādāya ātappaṃ karoti, anuppannānaṃ kusalānaṃ dhammānaṃ uppādāya ātappaṃ karoti, uppannānaṃ sārīrikānaṃ vedanānaṃ dukkhānaṃ tibbānaṃ kharānaṃ kaṭukānaṃ asātānaṃ amanāpānaṃ pāṇaharānaṃ adhivāsanāya ātappaṃ karoti, ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, bhikkhu ātāpī nipako sato sammā dukkhassa antakiriyāyā”ti. Bhikkhus, when a bhikkhu exerts ardor for the non-arising of unarisen bad, unskillful mental states, for the arising of unarisen skillful mental states, and for enduring arisen bodily feelings that are painful, racking, sharp, piercing, disagreeable, displeasing, threatening life, this is called, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu who is ardent, alert, and mindful for making a correct end of ill-being.

 

Another example of what being ātāpī means is given at AN 4.11:

 

“carato cepi… ṭhitassa cepi… nisinnassa cepi… sayānassa cepi, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno uppajjati kāmavitakko vā byāpādavitakko vā vihiṃsāvitakko vā, taṃ ce bhikkhu nādhivāseti, pajahati vinodeti byantīkaroti anabhāvaṃ gameti, sayānopi, bhikkhave, bhikkhu jāgaro evaṃbhūto ‘ātāpī ottāpī satataṃ samitaṃ āraddhavīriyo pahitatto’ti vuccati. If while walking… while standing… while sitting… while lying down a thought of sensuality, a thought of ill will or a thought of harming arises in a bhikkhu and he does not give in to it but abandons it, dispels it, removes it, and brings it to complete cessation, then while wakefully lying down that bhikkhu is said to be ardent, to fear wrongdoing and to be continually and continuously of aroused energy and resolute will.

 

And at AN 4.12:

 

“carato cepi… ṭhitassa cepi… nisinnassa cepi… sayānassa cepi, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno jāgarassa abhijjhābyāpādo vigato hoti, thinamiddhaṃ pahīnaṃ hoti, uddhaccakukuccaṃ pahīnaṃ hoti, vicikicchā pahīnā hoti, āraddhaṃ hoti vīriyaṃ asallīnaṃ, upaṭṭhitā sati asammuṭṭhā, passaddho kāyo asāraddho, samāhitaṃ cittaṃ ekaggaṃ, sayānopi, bhikkhave, bhikkhu jāgaro evaṃbhūto ‘ātāpī ottāpī satataṃ samitaṃ āraddhavīriyo pahitatto’ti vuccatī”ti. If while walking… while standing… while sitting… while wakefully lying down covetousness and ill-will have ceased in a bhikkhu, dullness and drowsiness are abandoned, mental agitation and worry are abandoned, doubt is abandoned, his energy is aroused relentlessly, his mindfulness is established and unconfused, his body is tranquil and calm, his mind is concentrated and unified, then while wakefully lying down that bhikkhu is said to be ardent, to fear wrongdoing and to be continually and continuously of aroused energy and resolute will.

 

A list of terms that appear to be related to ātappaṃ karoti and may help gathering the meaning of ātāpī is given at SN 12.87: sikkhā karoti (practice the training), yoga karoti (exert dedication), chanda karoti (stir up the desire), ussoḷhī karoti (make an exertion), appaṭivānī karoti (exert persistence), vīriyaṃ karoti (exert energy), sātaccaṃ karoti (exert perseverance), sati karoti (exert mindfulness), sampajaññaṃ karoti (exert clear comprehension), appamādo karoti (exert heedfulness).

SN 12.87

 

upādānaṃ, bhikkhave, ajānatā apassatā yathābhūtaṃ upādāne yathābhūtaṃ ñāṇāya sikkhā karaṇīyā… yogo karaṇīyo… chando karaṇīyo… ussoḷhī karaṇīyā… appaṭivānī karaṇīyā… ātappaṃ karaṇīyaṃ… vīriyaṃ karaṇīyaṃ… sātaccaṃ karaṇīyaṃ… sati karaṇīyā… sampajaññaṃ karaṇīyaṃ.. appamādo karaṇīyo. Bhikkhus, one who does not know, who does not see attachment as it really is should practice the training… exert dedication… stir up the desire… make an exertion… exert persistence… exert ardor… exert energy… exert perseverance… exert mindfulness… exert clear comprehension… exert heedfulness in order to know it as it really is.

 

Another list is found at DN 3 and adds padhāna, anuyoga and sammā·manasikāra (probably a synonym for yoniso manasikāra):

DN 3

 

ekacco samaṇo vā brāhmaṇo vā ātappamanvāya padhānamanvāya anuyogamanvāya appamādamanvāya sammāmanasikāramanvāya tathārūpaṃ cetosamādhiṃ phusati Some renuniciate or brahmin, by means of ardor, by means of effort, by means of dedication, by means of heedfulness, by means of proper consideration, attains such a concentration of the mind

 

Some suttas help understanding what being ātāpī means, as they explain what may happen when the practitioner is in that state:

SN 36.7

 

“tassa ce, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno evaṃ satassa sampajānassa appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato uppajjati sukhā vedanā… dukkhā vedanā. so evaṃ pajānāti: ‘uppannā kho myāyaṃ dukkhā vedanā. sā ca kho paṭicca, no appaṭicca. kiṃ paṭicca? imameva kāyaṃ paṭicca. ayaṃ kho pana kāyo anicco saṅkhato paṭiccasamuppanno. aniccaṃ kho pana saṅkhataṃ paṭiccasamuppannaṃ kāyaṃ paṭicca uppannā dukkhā vedanā kuto niccā bhavissatī’ti! so kāye ca dukkhāya vedanāya aniccānupassī viharati, vayānupassī viharati, virāgānupassī viharati, nirodhānupassī viharati, paṭinissaggānupassī viharati. tassa kāye ca dukkhāya ca vedanāya aniccānupassino viharato, vayānupassino viharato, virāgānupassino viharato, nirodhānupassino viharato, paṭinissaggānupassino viharato, yo kāye ca dukkhāya ca vedanāya paṭighānusayo, so pahīyati. As a monk is dwelling thus mindful & alert — heedful, ardent, & resolute — a feeling of pleasure… a feeling of pain arises in him. He discerns that ‘A feeling of pain has arisen in me. It is dependent on a requisite condition, not independent. Dependent on what? Dependent on this body. Now, this body is inconstant, fabricated, dependently co-arisen. Being dependent on a body that is inconstant, fabricated, & dependently co-arisen, how can this feeling of pain that has arisen be constant?’ He remains focused on inconstancy with regard to the body & to the feeling of pain. He remains focused on dissolution… dispassion… cessation… relinquishment with regard to the body & to the feeling of pain. As he remains focused on inconstancy… dissolution… dispassion… cessation… relinquishment with regard to the body & to the feeling of pain, he abandons any resistance-obsession with regard to the body & the feeling of pain.
“tassa ce, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno evaṃ satassa sampajānassa appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato uppajjati adukkhamasukhā vedanā… yo kāye ca adukkhamasukhāya ca vedanāya avijjānusayo, so pahīyati. As he is dwelling thus mindful & alert — heedful, ardent, & resolute — a feeling of neither-pleasure-nor-pain arises in him… he abandons any ignorance-obsession with regard to the body & the feeling of neither-pleasure-nor-pain.

 

For a more refined understanding of the expression and what it may have meant at the time, it is interesting to study related words. We may start by noting that the closest word in Sanskrit is ātapya (आतप्य), meaning ‘being in the sunshine’.

1) The first shade of meaning is best illustrated by the verb tapati, meaning ‘to shine’, as at SN 1.26: ‘divā tapati ādicco’ (the sun shines by day) or at SN 21.11: ‘sannaddho khattiyo tapati’ (the khattiya shines clad in armor).

2) The second shade of meaning can be derived from the first by noting that staying where the sun shines in a tropical climate generally turns out to be a hot and unpleasant experience, which may be how tapati comes to refer to the dukkha·vipāka that arises as a result of akusala kamma. Thus, at AN 10.141, the tenfold micchā·paṭipadā is called ‘the teaching that causes torment’ (tapanīyo dhammo). AN 2.3 provides more detail about the workings of these torments:

 

“dveme, bhikkhave, dhammā tapanīyā. katame dve? idha, bhikkhave, ekaccassa kāyaduccaritaṃ kataṃ hoti, akataṃ hoti kāyasucaritaṃ; vacīduccaritaṃ kataṃ hoti; akataṃ hoti vacīsucaritaṃ; manoduccaritaṃ kataṃ hoti, akataṃ hoti manosucaritaṃ. so ‘kāyaduccaritaṃ me katan’ti tappati, ‘akataṃ me kāyasucaritan’ti tappati; ‘vacīduccaritaṃ me katan’ti tappati, ‘akataṃ me vacīsucaritan’ti tappati; ‘manoduccaritaṃ me katan’ti tappati, ‘akataṃ me manosucaritan’ti tappati. ime kho, bhikkhave, dve dhammā tapanīyā”ti. Bhikkhus, these two things cause torment. Which two? Here, bhikkhus, someone has performed bodily misconduct and has not performed bodily good conduct; he has performed verbal misconduct and has not performed verbal good conduct; he has performed mental misconduct and has not performed mental good conduct. He is tormented, [thinking]: ‘I have performed bodily misconduct’; he is tormented, [thinking]: ‘I have not performed bodily good conduct’; he is tormented, [thinking]: ‘I have performed verbal misconduct’; he is tormented, [thinking]: ‘I have not performed verbal good conduct’; he is tormented, [thinking]: ‘I have performed mental misconduct’; he is tormented, [thinking]: ‘I have not performed mental good conduct.’ These, bhikkhus, are two things that cause torment.

 

We also find various instances of words related to tapati, used to refer to dukkha·vipāka and the remorse the wrong-doer experiences:

SN 2.8

 

akataṃ dukkaṭaṃ seyyo, pacchā tapati dukkaṭaṃ. Better left undone is a wrong deed, for a wrong deed later brings torment.

 

SN 2.22

 

na taṃ kammaṃ kataṃ sādhu, yaṃ katvā anutappati. An action which, once performed, brings torment is not well done.

 

Dhp 17

 

idha tappati pecca tappati,
pāpakārī ubhayattha tappati.
‘pāpaṃ me katan’ti tappati,
bhiyyo tappati duggatiṃ gato.
The evil-doer is tormented here and is tormented hereafter,
He is tormented in both [worlds].
He is tormented, [thinking]: ‘I have done evil [things]’,
And he is tormented even more when gone to a bad destination [after death].

 

 

3) The third shade of meaning is also derived from the first, as staying in the sunshine can also be a symbol for making an effort, for example to earn one’s living:

AN 5.33

 

“yo naṃ bharati sabbadā,
niccaṃ ātāpi ussuko.
sabbakāmaharaṃ posaṃ,
bhattāraṃ nātimaññati.
The one who always supports her
Constantly ardent and zealous
The man who brings what she desires,
Her husband she does not despise.

 

In another example, someone overcome by the three akusala·mūlas does not make an effort to correct the falsehood that is said to him:

AN 5.33

 

abhūtena vuccamāno na ātappaṃ karoti tassa nibbeṭhanāya itipetaṃ atacchaṃ itipetaṃ abhūtanti. When he is told things that are not factual, he doesn’t make an effort to correct it: ‘It is not true because of this, it is not factual because of this’.

 

 

4) The fourth connotation, stronger, is that of asceticism or austerities.

MN 12

 

iti evarūpaṃ anekavihitaṃ kāyassa ātāpana-paritāpan-ānuyogamanuyutto viharāmi. idaṃsu me, sāriputta, tapassitāya hoti. Thus in such a variety of ways I dwelt pursuing the practice of tormenting and mortifying the body. Such was my asceticism.

 

Those austerities are depicted at MN 51:

 

 

“katamo ca, bhikkhave, puggalo attantapo attaparitāpanānuyogamanuyutto? idha, bhikkhave, ekacco puggalo acelako hoti muttācāro hatthāpalekhano naehibhaddantiko natiṭṭhabhaddantiko; nābhihaṭaṃ na uddissakataṃ na nimantanaṃ sādiyati; so na kumbhimukhā paṭiggaṇhāti na kaḷopimukhā paṭiggaṇhāti na eḷakamantaraṃ na daṇḍamantaraṃ na musalamantaraṃ na dvinnaṃ bhuñjamānānaṃ na gabbhiniyā na pāyamānāya na purisantaragatāya na saṅkittīsu na yattha sā upaṭṭhito hoti na yattha makkhikā saṇḍasaṇḍacārinī; na macchaṃ na maṃsaṃ na suraṃ na merayaṃ na thusodakaṃ pivati. so ekāgāriko vā hoti ekālopiko, dvāgāriko vā hoti dvālopiko… sattāgāriko vā hoti sattālopiko; ekissāpi dattiyā yāpeti, dvīhipi dattīhi yāpeti… sattahipi dattīhi yāpeti; ekāhikampi āhāraṃ āhāreti, dvīhikampi āhāraṃ āhāreti… sattāhikampi āhāraṃ āhāreti iti evarūpaṃ aḍḍhamāsikaṃ pariyāyabhattabhojanānuyogamanuyutto viharati. so sākabhakkho vā hoti, sāmākabhakkho vā hoti, nīvārabhakkho vā hoti, daddulabhakkho vā hoti, haṭabhakkho vā hoti, kaṇabhakkho vā hoti, ācāmabhakkho vā hoti, piññākabhakkho vā hoti, tiṇabhakkho vā hoti, gomayabhakkho vā hoti; vanamūlaphalāhāro yāpeti pavattaphalabhojī. so sāṇānipi dhāreti, masāṇānipi dhāreti, chavadussānipi dhāreti, paṃsukūlānipi dhāreti, tirīṭānipi dhāreti, ajinampi dhāreti, ajinakkhipampi dhāreti, kusacīrampi dhāreti, vākacīrampi dhāreti, phalakacīrampi dhāreti, kesakambalampi dhāreti, vāḷakambalampi dhāreti, ulūkapakkhampi dhāreti; kesamassulocakopi hoti, kesamassulocanānuyogamanuyutto, ubbhaṭṭhakopi hoti āsanapaṭikkhitto, ukkuṭikopi hoti ukkuṭikappadhānamanuyutto, kaṇṭakāpassayikopi hoti kaṇṭakāpassaye seyyaṃ kappeti; sāyatatiyakampi udakorohanānuyogamanuyutto viharati iti evarūpaṃ anekavihitaṃ kāyassa ātāpanaparitāpanānuyogamanuyutto viharati. ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, puggalo attantapo attaparitāpanānuyogamanuyutto. And what, bhikkhus, is the person who torments himself and pursues the practice of mortifying himself? Here, bhikkhus, a certain person goes naked, rejecting conventions, licking his hands, not coming when asked, not stopping when asked; he does not accept food brought or food specially made or an invitation to a meal; he receives nothing from a pot, from a bowl, across a threshold, across a stick, across a pestle, from two eating together, from a pregnant woman, from a woman giving suck, from a woman lying with a man, from where food was advertised to be distributed, from where a dog was waiting, from where flies were buzzing; he accepts no fish or meat, he drinks no liquor, wine or fermented brew. He keeps to one house, to one morsel; he keeps to two houses, to two morsels;… he keeps to seven houses, to seven morsels. he lives on one saucerful a day, on two saucerfuls a day… on seven saucerfuls a day; he takes food once a day, once every two days… once every seven days, and so on up to once every fortnight; he dwels pursuing the practice of taking food at stated intervals. He is an eater of greens or millet or wild rice or hide-parings or moss or ricebran or rice-scum or sesamum flour or grass or cowdung. He lives on forest roots and fruits, he feeds on fallen fruits. He clothes himself in hemp, in hemp-mixed cloth, in shrouds, in refuse rags, in tree bark, in antelope hide, in strips of antelope hide, in kusa-grass fabric, in bark fabric, in wood-shavings fabric, in head-hair wool, in animal wool, in owls’ wings. He is one who pulls out hair and beard, pursuing the practice of pulling out hair and beard. He is one who stands continuously, rejecting seats. He is one who squats continuously, devoted to maintaining the squatting position. He is one who uses a mattress of spikes; he makes a mattress of spikes his bed. He dwells pursuing the practice of bathing in water three times daily including the evening. Thus in such a variety of ways he dwells pursuing the practice of tormenting and mortifying the body. This, bhikkhus, is what is called the person who torments himself and pursues the practice of mortifying himself.

 

Given on one hand this close proximity of the term ātāpī with the vocabulary of austerity and mortification and on the other the fact that the Buddha recommends being ātāpī (most prominently in the satipaṭṭhāna formulas), and knowing he also rejected self-mortification, in order to understand more precisely what he meant exactly by being ātāpī, it would appear useful to examine in greater details what his wider position was in regards to austerity.

First of all, it should be borne in mind that the Buddha clearly rejects the pursuit of self-mortification in his first recorded discourse, the Dhamma·cakka·ppavattana Sutta:

SN 56.11

 

“dveme, bhikkhave, antā pabbajitena na sevitabbā. katame dve? yo cāyaṃ kāmesu kāmasukhallikānuyogo hīno gammo pothujjaniko anariyo anatthasaṃhito, yo cāyaṃ attakilamathānuyogo dukkho anariyo anatthasaṃhito. These two extremes, bhikkhus, should not be adopted by one who has gone forth from the home life. Which two? On one hand, the pursuit of hedonism towards sensuality, which is inferior, vulgar, common, ignoble, deprived of benefit, and on the other hand the pursuit of self-mortification, which is painful, ignoble and deprived of benefit.

 

But at AN 10.94, the Buddha says he does not reject categorically both « all austerity » and « all ascetics leading the rough life », as it all depends on whether their practice removes unwholesome states and brings about wholesome ones, or not:

 

— “saccaṃ kira, gahapati, samaṇo gotamo sabbaṃ tapaṃ garahati, sabbaṃ tapassiṃ lūkhājīviṃ ekaṃsena upakkosati upavadatī”ti? — « Is it true, householder, that Gotama the contemplative criticizes all asceticism, that he categorically denounces & disparages all ascetics who live the rough life? »
— “na kho, bhante, bhagavā sabbaṃ tapaṃ garahati napi sabbaṃ tapassiṃ lūkhājīviṃ ekaṃsena upakkosati upavadati. — « No, venerable sirs, the Blessed One does not criticize all asceticism, nor does he categorically denounce or disparage all ascetics who live the rough life.
… [The Blessed One:]
nāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbaṃ tapaṃ tapitabbanti vadāmi; na ca panāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbaṃ tapaṃ na tapitabbanti vadāmi; nāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbaṃ samādānaṃ samāditabbanti vadāmi; na panāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbaṃ samādānaṃ na samāditabbanti vadāmi; nāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbaṃ padhānaṃ padahitabbanti vadāmi; na panāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbaṃ padhānaṃ na padahitabbanti vadāmi; nāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbo paṭinissaggo paṭinissajjitabboti vadāmi. na panāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbo paṭinissaggo na paṭinissajjitabboti vadāmi; nāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbā vimutti vimuccitabbāti vadāmi; na panāhaṃ, gahapati, sabbā vimutti na vimuccitabbāti vadāmi. I don’t say that all asceticism is to be pursued, nor do I say that all asceticism is not to be pursued. I don’t say that all observances should be observed, nor do I say that all observances should not be observed. I don’t say that all exertions are to be pursued, nor do I say that all exertions are not to be pursued. I don’t say that all forfeiture should be forfeited, nor do I say that all forfeiture should not be forfeited. I don’t say that all release is to be used for release, nor do I say that all release is not to be used for release.
“yañhi, gahapati, tapaṃ tapato akusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti, kusalā dhammā parihāyanti, evarūpaṃ tapaṃ na tapitabbanti vadāmi. yañca khvassa gahapati, tapaṃ tapato akusalā dhammā parihāyanti, kusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti, evarūpaṃ tapaṃ tapitabbanti vadāmi. « If, when an ascetic practice is pursued, unskillful qualities grow and skillful qualities wane, then I tell you that that sort of asceticism is not to be pursued. But if, when an ascetic practice is pursued, unskillful qualities wane and skillful qualities grow, then I tell you that that sort of asceticism is to be pursued.
“yañhi, gahapati, samādānaṃ samādiyato… padhānaṃ padahato… paṭinissaggaṃ paṭinissajjato… vimuttiṃ vimuccato akusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti, kusalā dhammā parihāyanti, evarūpā vimutti na vimuccitabbāti vadāmi. yañca khvassa, gahapati, vimuttiṃ vimuccato akusalā dhammā parihāyanti, kusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti, evarūpā vimutti vimuccitabbāti vadāmī”ti. « If, when an observance is observed… when an exertion is pursued… a forfeiture is forfeited… a release is used for release, unskillful qualities grow and skillful qualities wane, then I tell you that that sort of release is not to be used for release. But if, when a release is used for release, unskillful qualities wane and skillful qualities grow, then I tell you that that sort of release is to be used for release. »

 

But again, by contrast, at SN 42.12, while still not rejecting categorically both « all austerity » and « all ascetics leading the rough life », the Buddha does seem to reject categorically the fact of ‘attānaṃ ātāpeti paritāpeti’ (tormenting and torturing oneself), by presenting it as a reason good enough by itself to draw disapproval:

SN 42.12

 

ekamantaṃ nisinno kho rāsiyo gāmaṇi bhagavantaṃ etadavoca: Having sat down to one side, Rasiya the headman said to the Blessed One:
— “sutaṃ metaṃ, bhante, ‘samaṇo gotamo sabbaṃ tapaṃ garahati, sabbaṃ tapassiṃ lūkhajīviṃ ekaṃsena upavadati upakkosatī’ti . ye te, bhante, evamāhaṃsu… kacci te, bhante, bhagavato vuttavādino, na ca bhagavantaṃ abhūtena abbhācikkhanti, dhammassa cānudhammaṃ byākaronti, na ca koci sahadhammiko vādānuvādo gārayhaṃ ṭhānaṃ āgacchatī”ti? — Bhante, I have heard: ‘The renunciate Gotama disapproves of all austerity, he categorically criticizes and blames all ascetics leading a rough life.’ Those who say this, Bhante… do they speak in line with what the Blessed One has said, do they not misrepresent the Blessed One with what is contrary to fact, do they answer in line with the Dhamma, so that no one whose thinking is in line with the Dhamma would have grounds for criticizing them?
— “ye te, gāmaṇi, evamāhaṃsu… na me te vuttavādino, abbhācikkhanti ca pana maṃ te asatā tucchā abhūtena”. — Those who say this, headman, do not speak in line with what I have said, and they misrepresent me with what is false and contrary to fact.
“tatra, gāmaṇi, yvāyaṃ tapassī lūkhajīvī attānaṃ ātāpeti paritāpeti, kusalañca dhammaṃ adhigacchati, uttari ca manussadhammā alamariyañāṇadassanavisesaṃ sacchikaroti. ayaṃ, gāmaṇi, tapassī lūkhajīvī ekena ṭhānena gārayho, dvīhi ṭhānehi pāsaṃso. katamena ekena ṭhānena gārayho? attānaṃ ātāpeti paritāpetīti, iminā ekena ṭhānena gārayho. katamehi dvīhi ṭhānehi pāsaṃso? kusalañca dhammaṃ adhigacchatīti, iminā paṭhamena ṭhānena pāsaṃso. uttari ca manussadhammā alamariyañāṇadassanavisesaṃ sacchikarotīti, iminā dutiyena ṭhānena pāsaṃso. Here, headman, regarding the ascetic leading a rough life who torments and tortures himself, yet achieves a wholesome state and realizes a supra-human state, an attainment in knowledge and vision that is suitable to the noble ones, this ascetic leading a rough life, headman, may be disapproved of on one ground and praised on two grounds. And what is the one ground on which he may be disapproved of? He torments and tortures himself: this is the one ground on which he may be disapproved of. And what are the two grounds on which he may be praised? He achieves a wholesome state: this is the first ground on which he may be praised. He realizes a supra-human state, an attainment in knowledge and vision that is suitable to the noble ones: this is the second ground on which he may be praised.

 

Yet the exact same combination of verbs, ‘ātāpeti paritāpeti’ (meaning here to heat and burn), is also used (although with a different connotation) at MN 101 in a simile illustrating a recommended kind of unpleasant practice:

MN 101

 

“kathañca, bhikkhave, saphalo upakkamo hoti, saphalaṃ padhānaṃ? idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu na heva anaddhabhūtaṃ attānaṃ dukkhena addhabhāveti, dhammikañca sukhaṃ na pariccajati, tasmiñca sukhe anadhimucchito hoti. so evaṃ pajānāti: ‘imassa kho me dukkhanidānassa saṅkhāraṃ padahato saṅkhārappadhānā virāgo hoti, imassa pana me dukkhanidānassa ajjhupekkhato upekkhaṃ bhāvayato virāgo hotī’ti. so yassa hi khvāssa dukkhanidānassa saṅkhāraṃ padahato saṅkhārappadhānā virāgo hoti, saṅkhāraṃ tattha padahati. yassa panassa dukkhanidānassa ajjhupekkhato upekkhaṃ bhāvayato virāgo hoti, upekkhaṃ tattha bhāveti. tassa tassa dukkhanidānassa saṅkhāraṃ padahato saṅkhārappadhānā virāgo hoti. evampissa taṃ dukkhaṃ nijjiṇṇaṃ hoti. tassa tassa dukkhanidānassa ajjhupekkhato upekkhaṃ bhāvayato virāgo hoti. evampissa taṃ dukkhaṃ nijjiṇṇaṃ hoti. « And how is striving fruitful, how is exertion fruitful? There is the case where a monk, when not loaded down, does not load himself down with pain, nor does he reject pleasure that accords with the Dhamma, although he is not fixated on that pleasure. He discerns that ‘When I exert a [physical, verbal, or mental] fabrication against this cause of stress, then from the fabrication of exertion there is dispassion. When I look on with equanimity at that cause of stress, then from the development of equanimity there is dispassion.’ So he exerts a fabrication against the cause of stress where there comes dispassion from the fabrication of exertion, and develops equanimity with regard to the cause of stress where there comes dispassion from the development of equanimity. Thus the stress coming from the cause of stress for which there is dispassion through the fabrication of exertion is exhausted & the stress resulting from the cause of stress for which there is dispassion through the development of equanimity is exhausted.
“seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, puriso itthiyā sāratto paṭibaddhacitto tibbacchando tibbāpekkho. so taṃ itthiṃ passeyya aññena purisena saddhiṃ santiṭṭhantiṃ sallapantiṃ sañjagghantiṃ saṃhasantiṃ. taṃ kiṃ maññatha, bhikkhave, api nu tassa purisassa amuṃ itthiṃ disvā aññena purisena saddhiṃ santiṭṭhantiṃ sallapantiṃ sañjagghantiṃ saṃhasantiṃ uppajjeyyuṃ soka-parideva-dukkha-domanass-ūpāyāsā”ti? « Suppose that a man is in love with a woman, his mind ensnared with fierce desire, fierce passion. He sees her standing with another man, chatting, joking, & laughing. What do you think, monks: As he sees her standing with another man, chatting, joking, & laughing, would sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair arise in him? »
— “evaṃ, bhante”. — « Yes, lord.
— “taṃ kissa hetu”? — Why is that?
— “amu hi, bhante, puriso amussā itthiyā sāratto paṭibaddhacitto tibbacchando tibbāpekkho… soka-parideva-dukkha-domanass-ūpāyāsā”ti. — Because he is in love with her, his mind ensnared with fierce desire, fierce passion… sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair would arise in him.
— “atha kho, bhikkhave, tassa purisassa evamassa: ‘ahaṃ kho amussā itthiyā sāratto paṭibaddhacitto tibbacchando tibbāpekkho. tassa me amuṃ itthiṃ disvā aññena purisena saddhiṃ santiṭṭhantiṃ sallapantiṃ sañjagghantiṃ saṃhasantiṃ uppajjanti sokaparidevadukkhadomanassūpāyāsā. yaṃnūnāhaṃ yo me amussā itthiyā chandarāgo taṃ pajaheyyan’ti. so yo amussā itthiyā chandarāgo taṃ pajaheyya. so taṃ itthiṃ passeyya aparena samayena aññena purisena saddhiṃ santiṭṭhantiṃ sallapantiṃ sañjagghantiṃ saṃhasantiṃ. taṃ kiṃ maññatha, bhikkhave, api nu tassa purisassa amuṃ itthiṃ disvā aññena purisena saddhiṃ santiṭṭhantiṃ sallapantiṃ sañjagghantiṃ saṃhasantiṃ uppajjeyyuṃ sokaparidevadukkhadomanassūpāyāsā”ti? — « Now suppose the thought were to occur to him, ‘I am in love with this woman, my mind ensnared with fierce desire, fierce passion. When I see her standing with another man, chatting, joking, & laughing, then sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair arise within me. Why don’t I abandon my desire & passion for that woman?’ So he abandons his desire & passion for that woman, and afterwards sees her standing with another man, chatting, joking, & laughing. What do you think, monks: As he sees her standing with another man, chatting, joking, & laughing, would sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair arise in him? »
— “no hetaṃ, bhante”. — « No, lord.
— “taṃ kissa hetu”? — Why is that?
— “amu hi, bhante, puriso amussā itthiyā virāgo. tasmā taṃ itthiṃ disvā aññena purisena saddhiṃ santiṭṭhantiṃ sallapantiṃ sañjagghantiṃ saṃhasantiṃ na uppajjeyyuṃ sokaparidevadukkhadomanassūpāyāsā”ti. — He is dispassionate toward that woman. As he sees her standing with another man, chatting, joking, & laughing, sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair would not arise in him.
— “evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu na heva anaddhabhūtaṃ attānaṃ dukkhena addhabhāveti, dhammikañca sukhaṃ na pariccajati, tasmiñca sukhe anadhimucchito hoti. so evaṃ pajānāti: ‘imassa kho me dukkhanidānassa saṅkhāraṃ padahato saṅkhārappadhānā virāgo hoti, imassa pana me dukkhanidānassa ajjhupekkhato upekkhaṃ bhāvayato virāgo hotī’ti. so yassa hi khvāssa dukkhanidānassa saṅkhāraṃ padahato saṅkhārappadhānā virāgo hoti, saṅkhāraṃ tattha padahati; yassa panassa dukkhanidānassa ajjhupekkhato upekkhaṃ bhāvayato virāgo hoti, upekkhaṃ tattha bhāveti. tassa tassa dukkhanidānassa saṅkhāraṃ padahato saṅkhārappadhānā virāgo hoti: evampissa taṃ dukkhaṃ nijjiṇṇaṃ hoti. tassa tassa dukkhanidānassa ajjhupekkhato upekkhaṃ bhāvayato virāgo hoti: evampissa taṃ dukkhaṃ nijjiṇṇaṃ hoti. evampi, bhikkhave, saphalo upakkamo hoti, saphalaṃ padhānaṃ. — « In the same way, the monk, when not loaded down, does not load himself down with pain, nor does he reject pleasure that accords with the Dhamma, although he is not infatuated with that pleasure. He discerns that ‘When I exert a [physical, verbal, or mental] fabrication against this cause of stress, then from the fabrication of exertion there is dispassion. When I look on with equanimity at that cause of stress, then from the development of equanimity there is dispassion.’ So he exerts a fabrication against the cause of stress where there comes dispassion from the fabrication of exertion, and develops equanimity with regard to the cause of stress where there comes dispassion from the development of equanimity. Thus the stress coming from the cause of stress for which there is dispassion through the fabrication of exertion is exhausted & the stress resulting from the cause of stress for which there is dispassion through the development of equanimity is exhausted. This, bhikkhus, is how striving is fruitful, how exertion is fruitful.
“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu iti paṭisañcikkhati: ‘yathāsukhaṃ kho me viharato akusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti, kusalā dhammā parihāyanti; dukkhāya pana me attānaṃ padahato akusalā dhammā parihāyanti, kusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti. yaṃnūnāhaṃ dukkhāya attānaṃ padaheyyan’ti. so dukkhāya attānaṃ padahati. tassa dukkhāya attānaṃ padahato akusalā dhammā parihāyanti kusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti. so na aparena samayena dukkhāya attānaṃ padahati. taṃ kissa hetu? yassa hi so, bhikkhave, bhikkhu atthāya dukkhāya attānaṃ padaheyya svāssa attho abhinipphanno hoti. tasmā na aparena samayena dukkhāya attānaṃ padahati. « Furthermore, the monk notices this: ‘When I live according to my pleasure, unskillful mental qualities increase in me & skillful qualities decline. When I exert myself with stress & pain, though, unskillful qualities decline in me & skillful qualities increase. Why don’t I exert myself with stress & pain?’ So he exerts himself with stress & pain, and while he is exerting himself with stress & pain, unskillful qualities decline in him, & skillful qualities increase. Then at a later time he would no longer exert himself with stress & pain. Why is that? Because he has attained the goal for which he was exerting himself with stress & pain. That is why, at a later time, he would no longer exert himself with stress & pain.
seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, usukāro tejanaṃ dvīsu alātesu ātāpeti paritāpeti ujuṃ karoti kammaniyaṃ. yato kho, bhikkhave, usukārassa tejanaṃ dvīsu alātesu ātāpitaṃ hoti paritāpitaṃ ujuṃ kataṃ kammaniyaṃ, na so taṃ aparena samayena usukāro tejanaṃ dvīsu alātesu ātāpeti paritāpeti ujuṃ karoti kammaniyaṃ. taṃ kissa hetu? yassa hi so, bhikkhave, atthāya usukāro tejanaṃ dvīsu alātesu ātāpeyya paritāpeyya ujuṃ kareyya kammaniyaṃ svāssa attho abhinipphanno hoti. tasmā na aparena samayena usukāro tejanaṃ dvīsu alātesu ātāpeti paritāpeti ujuṃ karoti kammaniyaṃ. « Suppose a fletcher were to heat & warm an arrow shaft between two flames, making it straight & pliable. Then at a later time he would no longer heat & warm the shaft between two flames, making it straight & pliable. Why is that? Because he has attained the goal for which he was heating & warming the shaft. That is why at a later time he would no longer heat & warm the shaft between two flames, making it straight & pliable.
evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu iti paṭisañcikkhati: ‘yathāsukhaṃ kho me viharato akusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti, kusalā dhammā parihāyanti; dukkhāya pana me attānaṃ padahato akusalā dhammā parihāyanti, kusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti. yaṃnūnāhaṃ dukkhāya attānaṃ padaheyyan’ti. so dukkhāya attānaṃ padahati. tassa dukkhāya attānaṃ padahato akusalā dhammā parihāyanti, kusalā dhammā abhivaḍḍhanti. so na aparena samayena dukkhāya attānaṃ padahati. taṃ kissa hetu? yassa hi so, bhikkhave, bhikkhu atthāya dukkhāya attānaṃ padaheyya svāssa attho abhinipphanno hoti. tasmā na aparena samayena dukkhāya attānaṃ padahati. evampi, bhikkhave, saphalo upakkamo hoti, saphalaṃ padhānaṃ. « In the same way, the monk notices this: ‘When I live according to my pleasure, unskillful mental qualities increase in me & skillful qualities decline. When I exert myself with stress & pain, though, unskillful qualities decline in me & skillful qualities increase. Why don’t I exert myself with stress & pain?’ So he exerts himself with stress & pain, and while he is exerting himself with stress & pain, unskillful qualities decline in him, & skillful qualities increase. Then at a later time he would no longer exert himself with stress & pain. Why is that? Because he has attained the goal for which he was exerting himself with stress & pain. That is why, at a later time, he would no longer exert himself with stress & pain. This is how striving is fruitful, how exertion is fruitful.

 

Examples of some inherently unpleasant practices are mentioned elsewhere:

AN 4.163

 

“katamā ca, bhikkhave, dukkhā paṭipadā dandhābhiññā? idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu asubhānupassī kāye viharati, āhāre paṭikūlasaññī, sabbaloke anabhiratisaññī, sabbasaṅkhāresu aniccānupassī; maraṇasaññā kho panassa ajjhattaṃ sūpaṭṭhitā hoti. « And which is painful practice … ? There is the case where a monk remains focused on unattractiveness with regard to the body, percipient of loathsomeness with regard to food, percipient of non-delight with regard to the entire world, (and) focused on inconstancy with regard to all fabrications. The perception of death is well established within him.

 

A reason why some practices may become unpleasant is also mentioned at AN 4.162:

 

“katamā ca, bhikkhave, dukkhā paṭipadā … ? idha, bhikkhave, ekacco pakatiyāpi tibbarāgajātiko hoti, abhikkhaṇaṃ rāgajaṃ dukkhaṃ domanassaṃ paṭisaṃvedeti. pakatiyāpi tibbadosajātiko hoti, abhikkhaṇaṃ dosajaṃ dukkhaṃ domanassaṃ paṭisaṃvedeti. pakatiyāpi tibbamohajātiko hoti, abhikkhaṇaṃ mohajaṃ dukkhaṃ domanassaṃ paṭisaṃvedeti. « And which is painful practice … ? There is the case where a certain individual is normally of an intensely passionate nature. He perpetually experiences pain & distress born of passion. Or he is normally of an intensely aversive nature. He perpetually experiences pain & distress born of aversion. Or he is normally of an intensely deluded nature. He perpetually experiences pain & distress born of delusion.

 

The Buddha also goes so far as to accept the appellation ‘one who tortures [himself]’ (tapassī), saying that what he has tortured were actually akusala dhammas:

AN 8.12

 

“katamo ca, sīha, pariyāyo, yena maṃ pariyāyena sammā vadamāno vadeyya: ‘tapassī samaṇo gotamo, tapassitāya dhammaṃ deseti, tena ca sāvake vinetī’ti? tapanīyāhaṃ, sīha, pāpake akusale dhamme vadāmi kāyaduccaritaṃ vacīduccaritaṃ manoduccaritaṃ. yassa kho, sīha, tapanīyā pāpakā akusalā dhammā pahīnā ucchinnamūlā tālāvatthukatā anabhāvaṃkatā āyatiṃ anuppādadhammā, tamahaṃ ‘tapassī’ti vadāmi. tathāgatassa kho, sīha, tapanīyā pāpakā akusalā dhammā pahīnā ucchinnamūlā tālāvatthukatā anabhāvaṃkatā āyatiṃ anuppādadhammā. ayaṃ kho, sīha, pariyāyo, yena maṃ pariyāyena sammā vadamāno vadeyya: ‘tapassī samaṇo gotamo, tapassitāya dhammaṃ deseti, tena ca sāvake vinetī’”ti. And what, Siha, is the line of reasoning by which one speaking rightly could say of me: ‘The renunciate Gotama is one who tortures, he professes a teaching of torture and instructs his disciples accordingly’? I say, Siha, that bad, unwholesome states, bodily misconduct, verbal misconduct and mental misconduct are to be tortured. I say that one who has abandoned the bad, unwholesome states that are to be tortured, cut them off at their root, made them like a palmyra stump, annihilated them, so that they are unable to arise again in the future, is one who tortures himself. The Tathagata has abandoned the bad, unwholesome states that are to be tortured, cut them off at their root, made them like a palmyra stump, annihilated them, so that they are unable to arise again in the future. This is the line of reasoning by which one speaking rightly could say of me: ‘The renunciate Gotama is one who tortures himself, he professes a teaching of torture and instructs his disciples accordingly’.

 

So we may try to conclude here that what the Buddha rejected was the performance of unpleasant practices that would not help removing unwholesome states and developing wholesome ones (AN 10.94), or even if they do have that effect, the performance of unpleasant practices for themselves, as a way of ‘rough life’ (lūkhajīvita, SN 42.12). But even the right type of asceticism has to be undertaken in a balanced way, to avoid having it ending up developing unwholesome states:

AN 6.55

 

— “nanu te, soṇa, rahogatassa paṭisallīnassa evaṃ cetaso parivitakko udapādi: ‘ye kho keci bhagavato sāvakā āraddhavīriyā viharanti, ahaṃ tesaṃ aññataro. atha ca pana me na anupādāya āsavehi cittaṃ vimuccati, saṃvijjanti kho pana me kule bhogā, sakkā bhogā ca bhuñjituṃ puññāni ca kātuṃ. yaṃnūnāhaṃ sikkhaṃ paccakkhāya hīnāyāvattitvā bhoge ca bhuñjeyyaṃ puññāni ca kareyyan’”ti? — « Just now, as you were meditating in seclusion, didn’t this train of thought appear to your awareness: ‘Of the Blessed One’s disciples who have aroused their persistence, I am one, but my mind is not released from the fermentations through lack of clinging/sustenance. Now, my family has enough wealth that it would be possible to enjoy wealth & make merit. What if I were to disavow the training, return to the lower life, enjoy wealth, & make merit?' »
— “evaṃ, bhante”. — « Yes, lord. »
— “taṃ kiṃ maññasi, soṇa, kusalo tvaṃ pubbe agāriyabhūto vīṇāya tantissare”ti? — « Now what do you think, Sona. Before, when you were a house-dweller, were you skilled at playing the vina? »
— “evaṃ, bhante”. — « Yes, lord. »
— “taṃ kiṃ maññasi, soṇa, yadā te vīṇāya tantiyo accāyatā honti, api nu te vīṇā tasmiṃ samaye saravatī vā hoti kammaññā vā”ti? — « And what do you think: when the strings of your vina were too taut, was your vina in tune & playable? »
— “no hetaṃ, bhante”. — « No, lord. »
— “taṃ kiṃ maññasi, soṇa, yadā te vīṇāya tantiyo atisithilā honti, api nu te vīṇā tasmiṃ samaye saravatī vā hoti kammaññā vā”ti? — « And what do you think: when the strings of your vina were too loose, was your vina in tune & playable? »
— “no hetaṃ, bhante”. — « No, lord. »
— “yadā pana te, soṇa, vīṇāya tantiyo na accāyatā honti nātisithilā same guṇe patiṭṭhitā, api nu te vīṇā tasmiṃ samaye saravatī vā hoti kammaññā vā”ti? — « And what do you think: when the strings of your vina were neither too taut nor too loose, but tuned to be right on pitch, was your vina in tune & playable? »
— “evaṃ, bhante”. — « Yes, lord. »
— “evamevaṃ kho, soṇa, accāraddhavīriyaṃ uddhaccāya saṃvattati, atisithilavīriyaṃ kosajjāya saṃvattati. tasmātiha tvaṃ, soṇa, vīriyasamathaṃ adhiṭṭhahaṃ, indriyānañca samataṃ paṭivijjha, tattha ca nimittaṃ gaṇhāhī”ti. — « In the same way, Sona, over-aroused persistence leads to restlessness, overly slack persistence leads to laziness. Thus you should determine the right pitch for your persistence, attune the pitch of the [five] faculties [to that], and there pick up your theme. »

 

 

It may also be important to note that being ātāpī does not necessarily refer to unpleasant practice, since it can constitute the basis to enter the jhānas:

SN 48.40

 

idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato uppajjati dukkhindriyaṃ. so evaṃ pajānāti: ‘uppannaṃ kho me idaṃ dukkhindriyaṃ, tañca kho sanimittaṃ sanidānaṃ sasaṅkhāraṃ sappaccayaṃ. tañca animittaṃ anidānaṃ asaṅkhāraṃ appaccayaṃ dukkhindriyaṃ uppajjissatīti: netaṃ ṭhānaṃ vijjati’. so dukkhindriyañca pajānāti, dukkhindriyasamudayañca pajānāti, dukkhindriyanirodhañca pajānāti, yattha cuppannaṃ dukkhindriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati tañca pajānāti. kattha cuppannaṃ dukkhindriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati? idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicceva kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ pītisukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati: ettha cuppannaṃ dukkhindriyaṃ aparisesaṃ nirujjhati. ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, ‘bhikkhu aññāsi dukkhindriyassa nirodhaṃ, tadatthāya cittaṃ upasaṃharati’”. Here, bhikkhus, while a bhikkhu is remaining heedful, ardent and striving, the pain faculty arises. He understands thus: ‘The pain faculty has arisen in me; it possesses a feature, a cause, a construction, a condition. It is impossible that the pain faculty would arise without a feature, a cause, a construction, a condition’. He understands the pain faculty, he understands its origin, he understands its cessation, and he understands where the arisen pain faculty ceases completely. And where does the pain faculty cease completely? Here, bhikkhous, a bhikkhu, detached from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the first jhāna, remains therein, with thoughts, with thought processes, exaltation and well-being engendered by detachment: here the arisen pain faculty ceases completely. This is called, bhikkhus, ‘a bhikkhu who knows the cessation of the pain faculty, and who directs his mind to that end.’

 

The same is then repeated about domanass·indriya sukh·indriya somanass·indriya upekkh·indriya, respectively about the second, third, fourth jhānas and saññā·vedayita·nirodha. At MN 19, the same expression appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato (remaining heedful, ardent and striving) is similarly used to describe the state in which the Buddha was when he reached the three vijjās just before his awakening.

 

Pourquoi l’aspiration de non-nuisance (a·vihiṃsā·saṅkappa) n’est pas comprise dans l’aspiration de non-malveillance (a·byāpāda·saṅkappa)

Lorsqu’on étudie l’enseignement du Bouddha, on est rapidement amené à se pencher sur les quatre nobles vérités, et en particulier sur la noble voie. À cette fin, le Vibhaṅga Sutta (SN 45.8) nous offre une définition de chacune de ses huit composantes. C’est ainsi que l’on trouve la définition de sammāsaṅkappa:

Katamo ca, bhikkhave, sammāsaṅkappo? Yo kho, bhikkhave, nekkhamma-saṅkappo , abyāpāda-saṅkappo, avihiṃsā-saṅkappo. Ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, sammāsaṅkappo.

Et qu’est-ce, bhikkhous, que l’aspiration correcte? L’aspiration de renoncement, l’aspiration dénuée de malveillance et l’aspiration de non-nuisance. Voici ce qu’on appelle l’aspiration correcte.

L’expression « aspiration de non-nuisance » (avihiṃsā-saṅkappa) est souvent traduite par non-violence, non-cruauté, ou « inoffensivité » (harmlessness). Je me suis donc longtemps posé la question: pourquoi avoir distingué l’aspiration de non-nuisance/non-violence/non-cruauté/inoffensivité de l’aspiration dénuée de malveillance? Si je suis sans malveillance, comment puis-je avoir recours à la violence ou à la cruauté?

La réponse à cette question a fini par m’apparaître clairement alors que je séjournais dans un monastère au Sri Lanka. C’est un monastère de forêt où l’on rencontre tous les jours toutes sortes d’animaux, des serpents aux singes en passant par les écureuils (dont certains sont de la taille d’un gros chat – une espèce protégée). Lorsqu’il pleut (ce qui arrive environ 6 à 8 mois par an) il y a énormément d’escargots qui se mettent à parcourir la forêt et qui traversent les chemins bétonnés qui ont été aménagés pour les résidents. Avec la chute incessante des feuilles, ces chemins sont constamment jonchés de menus débris végétaux, et il n’est pas toujours facile de bien voir sur quoi on met le pied. Et donc dans ces moments-là, surtout si on ne fait pas bien attention, on a tendance à écraser des escargots.

À chaque fois, j’essayais d’imaginer ce que pouvait ressentir le pauvre animal à cause de mon manque de considération, et cela provoquait en moi une certaine dissonance cognitive qui me poussait à prendre la résolution de faire plus attention où je mettais les pieds. Un jour, alors que je parcourais le chemin avec un camarade et que je venais de marcher par inadvertance sur l’un d’entre eux, j’ai engagé la conversation avec lui sur le sujet, et il m’a répondu qu’il n’y avait rien de mal de ma part, puisque je n’avais pas intentionnellement écrasé l’animal. Mais je lui ai répondu qu’arrêter là l’analyse de la situation et continuer à marcher sans prendre gare, sans être vraiment de la malveillance, constituait plutôt une sorte d’indifférence face à une souffrance que l’on pouvait éviter d’administrer, fût-ce par inadvertance.

Et cette attitude me paraissait profondément erronée. La réponse correcte me semblait être de se résoudre à être plus présent d’esprit à chaque fois que l’on marche sur ces sentiers pour prévenir ce genre d’accident. Et c’est ainsi que m’est apparue la raison pour laquelle l’aspiration de non-nuisance (avihiṃsā·saṅkappa) est mentionnée séparément de l’aspiration dénuée de malveillance (abyāpāda·saṅkappa): on peut nuire à autrui sans pour autant être malveillant. Il y aurait donc d’un côté la nuisance intentionnelle (avec malveillance, byāpāda) et la nuisance non-intentionnelle (sans malveillance, abyāpāda).

On pourrait également prendre l’exemple des ascètes jaïns qui balayent leur chemin avant d’y marcher afin de s’assurer qu’ils n’écraseront pas d’insectes (c’est pourquoi on les voit généralement représentés avec un balai – en plumes de paon – à la main). Il n’y aurait certainement pas eu de malveillance de leur part à l’égard des insectes, simplement un préjudice dû à une certaine négligence, ce pourquoi ils se sont sentis jusqu’à aujourd’hui forcés de faire tout cela.

acharya5

Le balai se trouve juste à droite de l’ascète, car il ne s’en sépare pas

Dans un autre exemple, lorsqu’un moine rassemble du bois pour le feu qui sera utilisé pour laver ou teindre les robes, il se peut qu’il les garde à un endroit où les fourmis ou d’autres insectes ne viendront pas s’y installer, pour éviter qu’ils ne soient brûlés. Le préjudice leur aurait été infligé indirectement et sans malveillance, simplement par commodité, comme cela semble être autorisé par le Vinaya, du moins si l’on en croit l’expert occidental numéro un en la matière, à savoir Ajahn Thanissaro.

Ainsi, abyāpāda·saṅkappa correspondrait à l’aspiration dénuée de malveillance, ou remplie de bienveillance, alors qu’avihiṃsā·saṅkappa consituerait l’aspiration à ne pas porter préjudice à autrui, même par inadvertance, qui s’exprime par une certaine présence d’esprit et un certain nombre de choix, tels que s’organiser pour infliger un minimum de préjudice aux animaux, (pour les laïcs:) acheter un minimum de viande et de produits obtenus par violence envers les animaux, acheter un minimum de denrées produites par des industries qui exploitent la pauvreté des gens etc.

Si je ne me trompe pas, le Visuddhimagga relie abyāpāda·saṅkappa (l’aspiration dénuée de malveillance) à mettā·ceto·vimutti (la libération de l’esprit par la bienveillance) et avihiṃsā·saṅkappa (l’aspiration de non-nuisance) à karuṇā·ceto·vimutti (la libération de l’esprit par la compassion), ce qui a du sens. Celles-ci dont définies à AN 3.66:

ariyasāvako evaṃ vigatābhijjho vigatabyāpādo asammūḷho sampajāno patissato mettāsahagatena cetasā ekaṃ disaṃ pharitvā viharati, tathā dutiyaṃ, tathā tatiyaṃ, tathā catutthaṃ; iti uddhamadho tiriyaṃ sabbadhi sabbattatāya sabbāvantaṃ lokaṃ mettāsahagatena cetasā vipulena mahaggatena appamāṇena averena abyāpajjhena pharitvā viharati.

Un noble disciple, ainsi dénué de convoitise, dénué de malveillance, sans illusionnement, doué de compréhension attentive, constamment présent d’esprit, reste à imprégner une direction d’un esprit rempli de bienveillance, de même la deuxième, la troisième et la quatrième. Vers le haut et le bas, transversalement, dans toutes les directions, envers tous comme envers lui-même, il reste ainsi à imprégner le monde entier d’un esprit rempli de bienveillance, étendu, transcendant, sans limite, sans hostilité, sans malveillance.

 

karuṇāsahagatena cetasā ekaṃ disaṃ pharitvā viharati, tathā dutiyaṃ, tathā tatiyaṃ, tathā catutthaṃ, iti uddhamadho tiriyaṃ sabbadhi sabbattatāya sabbāvantaṃ lokaṃ upekkhāsahagatena cetasā vipulena mahaggatena appamāṇena averena abyāpajjhena pharitvā viharati.

Il reste à imprégner une direction d’un esprit rempli de compassion, de même la deuxième, la troisième et la quatrième. Vers le haut et le bas, transversalement, dans toutes les directions, envers tous comme envers lui-même, il reste ainsi à imprégner le monde entier d’un esprit rempli de compassion, étendu, transcendant, sans limite, sans hostilité, sans malveillance.

 

Comment traduire « saṅkappa »

Saṅkappa est un mot qu’il faut avoir bien compris si l’on veut saisir correctement le sens de la noble voie, puisqu’il intervient dans la deuxième de ses huit composantes, sammā-saṅkappa. Je me suis demandé pendant un certain temps quel devrait être la traduction correcte pour ce terme, et je me suis rendu compte que pas mal de gens se posaient la même question, puisque le terme est parfois traduit par « pensée » ou « intention, » qui ont des sens tout de même assez différents. Voici quelques traductions qu’utilisent les principaux traducteurs:

pensée, intention, aspiration, but, résolution (resolve)

Afin de clarifier la situation, j’ai encore une fois eu recours à une recherche systématique (et parfois un peu fastidieuse) dans les strates anciennes des écritures en Pali.

Il semble que le mot soit parfois exactement équivalent à vitakka (pensée), et que parfois il ait la connotation de souhait, désir, intention, but, finalité, résolution etc. et j’en suis venu à la conclusion qu’une bonne traduction pourrait être « une aspiration [qui s’articule en mots]. » Voici donc pourquoi j’en suis arrivé à cette conclusion.

Voyons d’abord les cas où saṅkappa signifie simplement vitakka, i.e. pensée:

Le cas le plus évident se trouve dans les versets qui suivent AN 8.30, l’Anuruddha-mahā-vitakka Sutta. Ici, je pense que tout le monde conviendra que le mot vitakka est clairement utilisé dans tout le soutta comme signifiant « pensée. » Mais les versets disent:

“mama saṅkappamaññāya, satthā loke anuttaro.
manomayena kāyena, iddhiyā upasaṅkami.
“yathā me ahu saṅkappo, tato uttari desayi.

Connaissant mes pensées, l’Enseignant suprême dans le monde,
Avec un corps produit par l’esprit, est venu au moyen de ses pouvoirs supra-normaux.
Il m’a montré ce qu’il y a au-delà de ce que touchaient mes pensées.

Ensuite, il y a AN 3.128, qui compare les pensées désavantageuses aux mouches:

pāpakā akusalā vitakkā makkhikā
les mouches représentent les pensées mauvaises et désavantageuses.

Et ensuite fait référence à ces mêmes mouches en utilisant le mot saṅkappa:

Aguttaṃ cakkhusotasmiṃ,
indriyesu asaṃvutaṃ;
Mak­khi­kā­nupa­tissanti,
saṅkappā rāganissitā.

Celui qui ne garde pas ses yeux et ses oreilles,
Qui n’est pas restreint dans ses facultés,
Les mouches le poursuivent,
[C’est à dire] les pensées basées sur l’avidité.

Ensuite, il y a AN 4.35, où vitakka et saṅkappa sont considérés soit comme des synonymes, soit comme ayant des significations très proches:

So yaṃ vitakkaṃ ākaṅkhati vitakketuṃ taṃ vitakkaṃ vitakketi, yaṃ vitakkaṃ nākaṅkhati vitakketuṃ na taṃ vitakkaṃ vitakketi; yaṃ saṅkappaṃ ākaṅkhati saṅkappetuṃ taṃ saṅkappaṃ saṅkappeti, yaṃ saṅkappaṃ nākaṅkhati saṅkappetuṃ na taṃ saṅkappaṃ saṅkappeti. Iti cetovasippatto hoti vitakkapathe.

Il pense toute pensée qu’il veut penser, et ne pense aucune pensée qu’il ne veut pas penser. Il aspire à toute aspiration à laquelle il veut aspirer, et n’aspire à aucune aspiration à laquelle il ne veut pas aspirer. Il a atteint la maîtrise de l’esprit en ce qui concerne les chemins de la pensée.

À MN 60, à la fois les expressions « pensée » et « penser » ou bien « aspiration » et « aspirer » pourraient faire l’affaire, puisque « saṅkappa » est ici un intermédiaire entre les vues (diṭṭhi) et la parole (vācā):

santaṃyeva kho pana paraṃ lokaṃ ‘natthi paro loko’ti saṅkappeti; svāssa hoti micchāsaṅkappo.

Parce qu’il y a réellement un autre monde, lorsqu’il aspire au fait qu’il n’y ait pas d’autre monde, c’est son aspiration erronée.

« Sara-saṅkappā, souvenirs et aspirations », est une expression instructive. Elle apparaît à MN 125 à propos d’un éléphant attrapé dans la forêt et qui va être dressé pour devenir utile au roi:

‘ehi tvaṃ, samma hatthidamaka, āraññakaṃ nāgaṃ damayāhi āraññakānañceva sīlānaṃ abhinimmadanāya āraññakānañceva sarasaṅkappānaṃ abhinimmadanāya āraññakānañceva darathakilamathapariḷāhānaṃ abhinimmadanāya

Va, ami dresseur d’éléphants, dompte l’éléphant forestier en jugulant ses habitudes forestières, en jugulant ses souvenirs et aspirations forestières et en jugulant ses angoisses, ses tracas et ses fièvres par rapport à la forêt

Également à SN 54.8:

bhikkhu cepi ākaṅkheyya: ‘ye me gehasitā sarasaṅkappā te pahīyeyyun’ti

si un bhikkhou souhaite: ‘Puissent les souvenirs et les aspirations liés à la vie de foyer être abandonnés en moi’

 

Encore plus intéressante, l’expression « paripuṇṇa-saṅkappo, ayant comblé [ses] aspirations, » met en évidence le fait qu’ici « pensée » ne serait pas une traduction adéquate. À MN 29:

so tena lābhasakkārasilokena attamano hoti paripuṇṇasaṅkappo.
Il est satisfait de ces acquisitions, honneurs et renommée, et ses aspirations sont comblées.

MN 146:

tā bhikkhuniyo nandakassa dhammadesanāya attamanā ceva paripuṇṇasaṅkappā ca

ces bhikhhounis sont satisfaites de l’enseignement du Dhamma de Nandaka et leurs aspirations sont comblées

 

Ensuite, MN 78 suggère que « saṅkappa » a à voir avec le langage et les pensées articulées par des concepts (lesquels sont cristallisés dans des mots):

daharassa hi, thapati, kumārassa mandassa uttānaseyyakassa saṅkappotipi na hoti, kuto pana pāpakaṃ saṅkappaṃ saṅkappissati, aññatra vikūjitamattā!

Même [la notion] ‘aspiration‘ n’apparaît pas chez un tendre bébé couché sur le dos, comment donc pourrait-il aspirer à une mauvaise aspiration, si ce n’est simplement par de la mauvaise humeur?

 

Le fait qu’un saṅkappa soit un souhait ou une aspiration qui serait articulé en mots peut être corroboré par la définition standard d’abyāpada, où le saṅkappa correspondant est formulé comme une phrase (et est donc constitué de mots). Par exemple à AN 10.176:

abyāpannacitto hoti appaduṭṭhamanasaṅkappo: ‘ime sattā averā hontu abyāpajjā, anīghā sukhī attānaṃ pariharantū’ti.

Il a un esprit sans malveillance, avec des aspirations amicales: ‘Puissent ces êtres être dénués de haine, sans malveillance, sans confusion, puissent-ils s’occuper d’eux-mêmes dans le bien-être.’

 

Ainsi donc, il me semble que le meilleur dénominateur commun à tous ces contextes serait « une aspiration [qui s’articule en mots]. »

Why avihiṃsā·saṅkappa is not included in abyāpāda·saṅkappa

To put it in a monk’s words:

In sammā·saṅkappa, we find abyāpāda·saṅkappa and avihiṃsā·saṅkappa (besides nekkhamma·saṅkappa). I still can’t see why is there a need to include avihiṃsā·saṅkappa. Shouldn’t abyāpāda·saṅkappa cover it?

I have been wondering the same thing for a while, and judging by the number of hits on the corresponding thread at DhammaWheel, so do quite some people.

The answer appeared to me while staying in a monastery where when it rains there are lots of snails crossing the paths, and if we are not careful enough, we easily crush them unintentionally. Then it stroke me that harming others does not necessarily happens intentionally.

Then the difference between avihiṃsā·saṅkappa and abyāpāda·saṅkappa could just be intention: there is harming others intentionally (with byāpāda) and unintentionally (without byāpāda, therefore not covered by abyāpāda).

One example could be that of Jain ascetics sweeping their path wherever they go to make sure they are not going to step on any insect. There would have been no ill will against the insect, just harming out of carelessness, so they felt compelled to do this. Another example is when a monk gathers wood for the fire to wash/dye robes: he might put it in a place where ants or insects won’t settle inside, in order to prevent them from being harmed. The harm would have also taken place without ill-will, just out of expediency, as it seems to be allowed by the Vinaya, according to Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Then abyāpāda·saṅkappa would be the aspiration of non ill will or benevolence, and avihiṃsā·saṅkappa would be the aspiration not to harm others, even unintentionally, which expresses itself by making choices to that end, like organizing oneself to inflict minimum harm on animals, (for lay people) becoming vegetarian or not buying from industries that resort to exploitation of poor people etc.

If I am not mistaken, the Visuddhimagga relates abyāpāda·saṅkappa (aspiration of non ill will) to mettā·ceto·vimutti (liberation of the mind through good will) and avihiṃsā·saṅkappa (aspiration of not harming) to karuṇā·ceto·vimutti (liberation of the mind through compassion), which does make some sense. Those are defined as follows:

SN 42.8
« That disciple of the noble ones — thus devoid of covetousness, devoid of ill will, unbewildered, alert, mindful — keeps pervading the first direction with an awareness imbued with good will, likewise the second, likewise the third, likewise the fourth. Thus above, below, & all around, everywhere, in its entirety, he keeps pervading the all-encompassing cosmos with an awareness imbued with good will — abundant, expansive, immeasurable, without hostility, without ill will. Just as a strong conch-trumpet blower can notify the four directions without any difficulty, in the same way, when the awareness-release through good will is thus developed, thus pursued, any deed done to a limited extent no longer remains there, no longer stays there. »

« That disciple of the noble ones — thus devoid of covetousness, devoid of ill will, unbewildered, alert, mindful — keeps pervading the first direction with an awareness imbued with compassion, likewise the second, likewise the third, likewise the fourth. Thus above, below, & all around, everywhere, in its entirety, he keeps pervading the all-encompassing cosmos with an awareness imbued with compassion — abundant, expansive, immeasurable, without hostility, without ill will. Just as a strong conch-trumpet blower can notify the four directions without any difficulty, in the same way, when the awareness-release through compassion is thus developed, thus pursued, any deed done to a limited extent no longer remains there, no longer stays there. »

Comment traduire « sammā »

L’adjectif et adverbe « sammā » revêt une importance toute particulière dans le Dhamma, puisqu’il est préfixé à chacune des composantes de la voie, laquelle constitue la quatrième noble vérité, qui se situe au cœur de l’enseignement du Bouddha:

1. sammā·diṭṭhi
2. sammā·saṅkappa
3. sammā·vācā
4. sammā·kammanta
5. sammā·ājīva
6. sammā·vāyāma
7. sammā·sati
8. sammā·samādhi

Il est donc utile de bien comprendre quelle devrait être la sammā·traduction de ce terme. Les trois propositions que l’on rencontre sont parfait, juste et correct pour la forme adjective. Sur la page Wikipédia de la noble voie à huit composantes, on peut lire:

Le terme « juste » est la traduction la plus fréquente du terme « sammā » qualifiant chaque étape du chemin ; certains auteurs le traduisent cependant par « parfait, » trouvant le terme « juste » trop restrictif.

Afin de répondre à cette question, je vais avoir recours à ma méthode favorite: l’analyse contextuelle, qui consiste à voir où et comment ce mot ou préfixe est utilisé dans les strates les plus anciennes des écritures en Pali, à savoir le Vinaya et les quatre Nikayas (i.e. sans le Kuddhakkha Nikaya, dont une grande partie est d’origine tardive) puis à tenter de trouver un dénominateur commun.

Tout d’abord, en ce qui concerne la traduction par « parfait » : le terme pourrait paraître faire partie des traductions possibles dans certains contextes, mais il est clairement inadapté dans plusieurs exemples. Dans la partie du Vinaya qui traite des règles mineures relatives à l’obtention et l’utilisation des robes, on trouve l’anecdote suivante:

tena kho pana samayena bārāṇaseyyakassa seṭṭhiputtassa mokkhacikāya kīḷantassa antagaṇṭhābādho hoti, yena yāgupi pītā na sammā pariṇāmaṃ gacchati, bhattampi bhuttaṃ na sammā pariṇāmaṃ gacchati, uccāropi passāvopi na paguṇo. so tena kiso hoti lūkho dubbaṇṇo uppaṇḍuppaṇḍukajāto dhamanisanthatagatto.

En une occasion, le fils d’un marchand de Bénarès, tandis qu’il s’amusait à faire des saltos, se mit à souffrir d’un nœud qui s’était formé dans ses intestins, de telle sorte qu’il ne digérait pas parfaitement le gruau de riz qu’il buvait, ni ne digérait parfaitement la nourriture qu’il mangeait ni ne se soulageait régulièrement. À cause de cela, il devint maigre, misérable, il arborait une mauvaise couleur jaunâtre et ses veines étaient apparentes partout sur son corps.

Ce n’est pas juste qu’il ne digérait pas parfaitement, il ne digérait presque pas du tout, on pourrait donc dire qu’il ne digérait pas correctement.

On trouve un autre exemple sans équivoque dans la section qui traite de la manière de préparer une robe pour l’offrande de kathina:

“evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, atthataṃ hoti kathinaṃ, evaṃ anatthataṃ. kathañca pana, bhikkhave, anatthataṃ hoti kathinaṃ? na ullikhitamattena atthataṃ hoti kathinaṃ, na dhovanamattena atthataṃ hoti kathinaṃsammā ceva atthataṃ hoti kathinaṃ, tañce nissīmaṭṭho anumodati, evampi anatthataṃ hoti kathinaṃ.

Bhikkhous, la robe kaṭhina est « déployée » d’une certaine manière, elle n’est pas « déployée » d’une certaine manière. Et comment la robe kaṭhina n’est-elle pas « déployée » d’une certaine manière? La robe kaṭhina n’est pas « déployée » simplement en la marquant, ni simplement en la lavant.. etc. (suit une longue liste d’instructions) … Et même si la robe kaṭhina est [par ailleurs] « déployée » parfaitement, mais que quelqu’un l’approuve en se tenant debout en dehors de la démarcation, la robe kaṭhina n’est pas [considérée comme] « déployée. »

Ici aussi, il est assez clair que « parfaitement » est trop fort, et que « correctement » convient beaucoup mieux, puisqu’il est fait référence à une série d’instructions à suivre.

Je considère donc comme acquis que la traduction de sammā par « parfait, » bien qu’elle puisse à première vue faire l’affaire dans certains contextes, ne convient pas de manière générale.

Le candidat suivant est donc l’adjectif « juste. » Ce terme a l’avantage, par rapport à « correct » qui, lui, serait plus fort, plus affirmatif, avec une connotation plus « moralisatrice » (car impliquant une certaine condamnation de ce qui est incorrect), voire plus martiale, d’être par contraste plus doux et moins moralisateur, ce qui pourrait expliquer pourquoi il est souvent choisi pour traduire sammā. On trouve en fait un certain nombre de cas où, si l’on s’en tient uniquement au contexte, à la fois « juste » et « correct » pourraient convenir.

sammā vadamāno vadeyya: …
S’il parlait correctement / de manière juste, il dirait: …

SN 2.30
te ve sammānusāsanti, paralokāya mātiyā”ti.
Ces mortels enseignent justement/correctement en ce qui concerne l’autre monde.

À SN 11.18, par contraste aux individus qui deviennent bhikkhous par exemple dans le but de fonder ensuite leur propre secte dont ils seraient le gourou:

sammāpabbajite vande, brahmacariyaparāyane.
Je respecte ceux qui ont quitté le foyer correctement/justement, en ayant pour objectif la vie brahmique.

À MN 11, également, il y a la manière incorrecte (dans le sens d’incomplète) d’exposer les attachements, par opposition à une manière correcte, ou juste de les enseigner:

“cattārimāni, bhikkhave, upādānāni. katamāni cattāri? kāmupādānaṃ, diṭṭhupādānaṃ, sīlabbatupādānaṃ, attavādupādānaṃ. santi, bhikkhave, eke samaṇabrāhmaṇā sabbupādānapariññāvādā paṭijānamānā, te na sammā sabbupādānapariññaṃ paññapenti: kāmupādānassa pariññaṃ paññapenti, na diṭṭhupādānassa pariññaṃ paññapenti, na sīlabbatupādānassa pariññaṃ paññapenti, na attavādupādānassa pariññaṃ paññapenti. taṃ kissa hetu? imāni hi te bhonto samaṇabrāhmaṇā tīṇi ṭhānāni yathābhūtaṃ nappajānanti.

Il y a, bhikkhous, ces quatre attachements. Quels sont ces quatre? L’attachement à la sensualité, l’attachement aux vues, l’attachement aux rites et préceptes et l’attachement aux doctrines [qui affirment l’existence] du Soi. Il y a, bhikkhous, des renonçants et brahmanes qui, bien qu’ils prétendent adhérer à une doctrine de la compréhension complète de tous les attachements, ne décrivent pas correctement/justement la compréhension complète de tous les attachements: ils décrivent la compréhension complète de l’attachement à la sensualité sans décrire la compréhension complète de l’attachement aux vues, l’attachement aux rites et préceptes et l’attachement aux doctrines [qui affirment l’existence] du Soi. Et quelle en est la raison? Par ce que ces vénérables renonçants et brahmanes ne comprennent pas ces trois cas-là tels qu’ils sont dans les faits.

Mais il y a également un grand nombre de cas où c’est le sens de « correct » (ou de ses synonymes « adéquat, » « approprié » ) qui prédomine clairement et où « juste » ne convient tout simplement pas. On l’a vu ci-dessus dans le cas de la robe kaṭhina, en rapport à une longue liste d’instructions:

Et même si la robe kaṭhina est [par ailleurs] « déployée » correctement, mais que quelqu’un l’approuve en se tenant debout en dehors de la démarcation, la robe kaṭhina n’est pas [considérée comme] « déployée. »

Ce n’est pas que la robe est « déployée » de manière juste, mais bien de manière correcte, par rapport aux instructions données précédemment. Un autre exemple, tiré également du Vinaya et faisant aussi référence à une longue liste de devoirs que les novices doivent remplir envers leur précepteur:

“saddhivihārikena, bhikkhave, upajjhāyamhi sammā vattitabbaṃ. tatrāyaṃ sammāvattanā: …

Les [novices] co-résidents, bhikkhous, devraient se comporter correctement vis-à-vis de leur précepteur. Maintenant, voici ce qu’est le comportement correct: …

On a donc ici une connotation de correctitude par rapport à un standard spécifique et prédéfini, plutôt que de justesse, par rapport au monde ou à la bonne conduite en général. Comme nous allons le voir, le terme a également un sens de correctitude par rapport à un résultat à obtenir. Voici un extrait de SN 22.101:

“Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, kukkuṭiyā aṇḍāni aṭṭha vā dasa vā dvādasa vā. tānassu kukkuṭiyā na sammā adhisayitāni, na sammā pariseditāni, na sammā paribhāvitāni. kiñcāpi tassā kukkuṭiyā evaṃ icchā uppajjeyya:‘aho, vata me kukkuṭapotakā pādanakhasikhāya vā mukhatuṇḍakena vā aṇḍakosaṃ padāletvā sotthinā abhinibbhijjeyyun’ti, atha kho abhabbāva te kukkuṭapotakā pādanakhasikhāya vā mukhatuṇḍakena vā aṇḍakosaṃ padāletvā sotthinā abhinibbhijjituṃ. taṃ kissa hetu? tathā hi pana, bhikkhave, kukkuṭiyā aṇḍāni aṭṭha vā dasa vā dvādasa vā; tāni kukkuṭiyā na sammā adhisayitāni, na sammā pariseditāni, na sammā paribhāvitāni.

Supposez, bhikkhous, qu’une poule ait huit, dix ou douze œufs qu’elle ne couvrirait pas correctement, qu’elle ne chaufferait pas correctement, qu’elle ne couverait pas correctement. Même si le désir apparaît en cette poule: ‘Que mes poussins percent leur coquille avec leurs becs ou leurs griffes, et qu’ils éclosent comme il faut!’, il est impossible que ses poussins percent leur coquille avec leurs becs ou leurs griffes, et qu’ils éclosent comme il faut. Et quelle en est la raison? Parce que cette poule ayant huit, dix ou douze œufs ne les a pas couverts correctement, ne les a pas chauffés correctement, ne les a pas couvés correctement.

Dans le même ordre d’idée nous avons à MN 21 une personne qui s’occupe de revitaliser une plantation auparavant laissée à l’abandon:

seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, gāmassa vā nigamassa vā avidūre mahantaṃ sālavanaṃ. tañcassa eḷaṇḍehi sañchannaṃ. tassa kocideva puriso uppajjeyya atthakāmo hitakāmo yogakkhemakāmo. so yā tā sālalaṭṭhiyo kuṭilā ojāpaharaṇiyo tā chetvā bahiddhā nīhareyya, antovanaṃ suvisodhitaṃ visodheyya. yā pana tā sālalaṭṭhiyo ujukā sujātā tā sammā parihareyya. evañhetaṃ, bhikkhave, sālavanaṃ aparena samayena vuddhiṃ virūḷhiṃ vepullaṃ āpajjeyya.

Supposez, bhikkhous, qu’il y ait une grande plantation d’arbres sāla près d’un village ou d’une ville, qu’elle soit étouffée par des mauvaises herbes à huile de ricin, et qu’un homme apparaisse, souhaitant son bien-être, sa prospérité et sa protection. Il couperait et jetterait les abrisseaux tordus qui accaparaient la sève, il nettoierait l’intérieur de la plantation, et il soignerait bien/correctement/adéquatement les abrisseaux formés et droits, de telle manière que la plantation d’arbres sāla se développerait, grandirait et atteindrait maturité.

Enfin, pour en revenir à la noble voie, afin d’examiner quelle est la traduction qui correspondrait le mieux, il est intéressant d’examiner sa version étendue, celle qui inclut sammā·ñāṇa (sammā·connaissance) et sammā·vimutti (sammā·libération). On trouve souvent des exemples de personnes qui prétendent faussement être devenus des arahants, en référence à une « fausse libération » (micchā·vimutti), comme à MN 27, où d’anciens renonçants hétérodoxes devenus arahants se rappellent ce qu’ils étaient auparavant:

manaṃ vata, bho, anassāma, manaṃ vata, bho, panassāma; mayañhi pubbe assamaṇāva samānā samaṇamhāti paṭijānimha, abrāhmaṇāva samānā brāhmaṇamhāti paṭijānimha, anarahantova samānā arahantamhāti paṭijānimha.

Assurément, Sieur, nous étions presque perdus, nous étions presque fichus, car auparavant, sans être des renonçants, nous prétendions en être, sans être des brahmanes, nous prétendions en être, sans être des arahants, nous prétendions en être.

À AN 6.55, le vénérable Soṇa va voir le Bouddha pour déclarer qu’il est devenu un arahant. Il le fait en décrivant son état de différentes manières, et il conclut sur des caractéristiques auxquelles on reconnaît quelqu’un qui a vraiment atteint la « libération correcte » par opposition aux libération fausses ou incorrectes précédemment mentionnées:

“evaṃ sammā vimuttacittassa, bhante, bhikkhuno bhusā cepi cakkhuviññeyyā rūpā cakkhussa āpāthaṃ āgacchanti, nevassa cittaṃ pariyādiyanti. amissīkatamevassa cittaṃ hoti, ṭhitaṃ, āneñjappattaṃ, vayañcassānupassati.

Chez un bhikkhou ainsi libéré correctement en esprit, Bhanté, même si de formidables formes connaissables par l’œil entrent dans le champ d’objets de son œil, elles ne prennent pas le contrôle de son esprit et son esprit n’en est pas même affecté; il se maintient en ayant atteint l’imperturbabilité, et en contemplant l’extinction [des phénomènes]. (idem pour les cinq autres objets des sens)

Il me semble assez clair à la pleine lumière du contexte que « justement » ne convient pas ici. En ce qui concerne la noble voie dans son ensemble, on peut avancer que le préfixe sammā dénote la correctitude par rapport à un standard défini (la noble voie elle-même) à l’instar des exemples ci-dessus tirés du Vinaya, et/ou la correctitude par rapport à un résultat à obtenir (la fin du mal-être) à l’instar des exemples de la poule et de la plantation ci-dessus. C’est pourquoi je tends à conclure de cette analyse que le véritable dénominateur commun dans tous ces cas, et spécifiquement dans celui de la noble voie, apparaît être les termes « correct » et « correctement. »

Une interprétation simple des cinq ‘khandhas’

Les cinq ‘khandhas‘ représentent des concepts clés dans l’enseignement du Bouddha. En effet, sa définition de la noble vérité du mal-être se résume à la formule:

saṅkhittena pañc·upādāna·kkhandhā dukkhā
en bref, les cinq accumulations d’attachement [constituent] le mal-être

Le problème, c’est que ces concepts, s’ils semblent avoir fait partie du paysage métaphysique de l’époque au même titre que les arbres ou (de nos jours) les pylônes électriques, ils n’en restent pas moins complètement étrangers à notre culture, et il peut ainsi s’avérer difficile de saisir à quoi il font exactement référence.

Je vais dans un premier temps expliquer pourquoi j’ai choisi de traduire ‘khandha’ par ‘accumulation’. La traduction standard en Anglais est ‘aggregate’, qu’on serait tenté de traduire tout simplement par ‘agrégat’. Certains arguent que « l’anglais aggregate est juste, le français agrégat est faux. L’équivalent d’aggregate est ensemble. Un khandha est l’ensemble de tous les éléments de même nature tandis qu’un agrégat agrège des éléments disparates. » Cela peut paraître un peu pointilleux, d’autant plus que chaque khandha agrège un type de phénomènes bien défini, à savoir Forme, Ressenti, Perception, Constructions et Conscience. Dans ce genre de cas, ce que je fais, c’est que je vais chercher l’ensemble des apparitions du mot dans le Vinaya et les quatre Nikayas (i.e. sans le Kuddhakkha Nikaya, dont une grande partie est d’origine tardive), je compare les différents contextes et j’essaie de trouver un dénominateur commun.

On trouve donc, entre autres, les expressions suivantes:

aggi·kkhandha: masse de feu, i.e. un bûcher (MN 35)
mahā udaka·kkhandha: une grande masse d’eau (en référence au Ganges à AN 3.101)
upari·khandha: la masse du haut [du corps], i.e. les épaules (SN 47.19)
khandh·aṭṭhika: un tas d’os (DN 22)
hatthi·kkhandha: une monture d’éléphant (SN 3.21)

parfois dans le sens de tronc d’un arbre:
mahantaṃ kadali·kkhandhaṃ: le tronc d’un grand arbre plantain (SN 22.95)
mahantaṃ dāru·kkhandhaṃ: un grand tronc (SN 35.242)

dans le sens de ‘section’ (d’un livre):
āpatti·kkhandha: section des transgressions (i.e. pārājika, saṅghādisesa, etc.)

avec une connotation abstraite:
avijjā·kkhandha: masse/accumulation d’ignorance
dukkha·kkhandha: masse/accumulation de mal-être
dosa·kkhandha: masse/accumulation d’aversion
pañña·kkhandha: masse/accumulation de discernement

À l’usage, il m’est apparut que le terme « accumulation » est celui qui sied le mieux dans les différents contextes où le mot est utilisé, surtout lorsqu’il a une connotation abstraite, comme c’est le cas pour les cinq accumulations d’attachement.

On trouve des explications du terme dans les souttas, mais il s’avère que les concepts mis en jeu dans ces explications sont considérés comme allant d’eux-mêmes, alors que ce n’est pas du tout le cas pour nous, et en définitive, comme nous allons le voir, ces explications ne sont vraiment compréhensibles pour nous que dans le cas de la première accumulation, la Forme.

MN 109

– “kittāvatā pana, bhante, khandhānaṃ khandhādhivacanaṃ hotī”ti?

– Mais, Bhanté, de quelle manière le terme ‘accumulation’ s’applique-t-il aux accumulations [d’attachement]?

– “yaṃ kiñci, bhikkhu, rūpaṃ, atītānāgatapaccuppannaṃ ajjhattaṃ vā bahiddhā vā, oḷārikaṃ vā sukhumaṃ vā, hīnaṃ vā paṇītaṃ vā, yaṃ dūre santike vā: ayaṃ rūpakkhandho. yā kāci vedanā: atītānāgatapaccuppannā ajjhattaṃ vā bahiddhā vā, oḷārikā vā sukhumā vā, hīnā vā paṇītā vā, yā dūre santike vā: ayaṃ vedanākkhandho. yā kāci saññā: atītānāgatapaccuppannā . pe . yā dūre santike vā: ayaṃ saññākkhandho. ye keci saṅkhārā: atītānāgatapaccuppannā ajjhattaṃ vā bahiddhā vā, oḷārikā vā sukhumā vā, hīnā vā paṇītā vā, ye dūre santike vā: ayaṃ saṅkhārakkhandho. yaṃ kiñci viññāṇaṃ: atītānāgatapaccuppannaṃ ajjhattaṃ vā bahiddhā vā, oḷārikaṃ vā sukhumaṃ vā, hīnaṃ vā paṇītaṃ vā, yaṃ dūre santike vā: ayaṃ viññāṇakkhandho. ettāvatā kho, bhikkhu, khandhānaṃ khandhādhivacanaṃ hotī”ti.

– Bhikkhou toute Forme [matérielle], qu’elle soit passée, présente ou future, intérieure ou extérieure, grossière ou subtile, inférieure ou sublime, éloignée ou proche: voici [ce qu’est] l’accumulation de la Forme. Tout Ressenti, qu’il soit passé, présent ou futur, intérieur ou extérieur, grossier ou subtil, inférieur ou sublime, éloigné ou proche: voici [ce qu’est] l’accumulation du Ressenti. Toute Perception, qu’elle soit passée, présente ou future, intérieure ou extérieure, grossière ou subtile, inférieure ou sublime, éloignée ou proche: voici [ce qu’est] l’accumulation de la Perception. Toutes Constructions, qu’elles soient passées, présentes ou futures, intérieures ou extérieures, grossières ou subtiles, inférieures ou sublimes, éloignées ou proches: voici [ce qu’est] l’accumulation des Consctructions. Toute Conscience, qu’elle soit passée, présente ou future, intérieure ou extérieure, grossière ou subtile, inférieure ou sublime, éloignée ou proche: voici [ce qu’est] l’accumulation de la Conscience. C’est de cette manière, bhikkhou, que le terme ‘accumulation’ s’applique aux accumulations [d’attachement].

Dans le cas de la Forme matérielle, on comprend que le corps humain est fait de matière organique et d’eau, comme on peut en trouver partout autour, ça a du sens pour nous. Mais si on n’est pas familier avec les concepts de Ressenti, Perception, Constructions et Conscience, le reste n’est pas très explicatif, ou en tout cas il ne nous permet pas facilement de conclure: eurêka!

On trouve une autre tentative de définition des khandhas, cette fois avec des exemples, qui permet de lever un coin du voile. Il s’agit de SN 22.79:

 Kiñca, bhikkhave, rūpaṃ vadetha? Ruppatīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘rūpa’nti vuccati. Kena ruppati? Sītenapi ruppati, uṇhenapi ruppati, jighacchāyapi ruppati, pipāsāyapi ruppati, ḍaṃsa-makasa-vātātapa-sarīsapa-samphassenapi ruppati. Ruppatīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘rūpa’nti vuccati.

Et pourquoi, bhikkhous, l’appelez-vous Forme? C’est parce qu’elle se fait déformer, bhikkhous, qu’elle est appelée ‘Forme’. Déformer par quoi? Déformer par le froid, déformer par la chaleur, déformer par la faim, déformer par la soif, déformer par le contact avec les mouches, les moustiques, le vent, le soleil et les rampants. C’est parce qu’elle se fait déformer, bhikkhous, qu’elle est appelée ‘Forme’.

Kiñca, bhikkhave, vedanaṃ vadetha? Vedayatīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘vedanā’ti vuccati. Kiñca vedayati? Sukhampi vedayati, dukkhampi vedayati, adukkhamasukhampi vedayati. Vedayatīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘vedanā’ti vuccati.

Et pourquoi, bhikkhous, l’appelez-vous Ressenti? C’est parce qu’il ressent, bhikkhous, qu’il est appelé ‘Ressenti’. Et que ressent-il? Il ressent le bien-être, il ressent le mal-être, il ressent ce qui est neutre. C’est parce qu’il ressent, bhikkhous, qu’il est appelé ‘Ressenti’.

Kiñca, bhikkhave, saññaṃ vadetha? Sañjānātīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘saññā’ti vuccati. Kiñca sañjānāti? Nīlampi sañjānāti, pītakampi sañjānāti, lohitakampi sañjānāti, odātampi sañjānāti. Sañjānātīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘saññā’ti vuccati.

Et pourquoi, bhikkhous, l’appelez-vous Perception? C’est parce qu’elle perçoit, bhikkhous qu’elle est appelée ‘Perception’. Et que perçoit-elle? Elle perçoit le bleu, elle perçoit le jaune, elle perçoit le rouge, elle perçoit le blanc. C’est parce qu’elle perçoit, bhikkhous qu’elle est appelée ‘Perception’.

Kiñca, bhikkhave, saṅkhāre vadetha? Saṅkhatam-abhisaṅkharontīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘saṅkhārā’ti vuccati. Kiñca saṅkhatam-abhisaṅkharonti? Rūpaṃ rūpattāya saṅkhatam-abhisaṅkharonti, vedanaṃ vedanattāya saṅkhatam-abhisaṅkharonti, saññaṃ saññattāya saṅkhatam-abhisaṅkharonti, saṅkhāre saṅkhārattāya saṅkhatam-abhisaṅkharonti, viññāṇaṃ viññāṇattāya saṅkhatam-abhisaṅkharonti. Saṅkhatam-abhisaṅkharontīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘saṅkhārā’ti vuccati.

Et pourquoi, bhikkhous, les appelez-vous Fabrications? C’est parce qu’elles construisent le construit, bhikkhous, qu’elles sont appelées ‘Fabrications’. Et quel construit construisent-elles? Elles construisent la Forme en tant que construction, ce qui a pour conséquence le fait d’être doué de Forme. Elles construisent le Ressenti en tant que construction, ce qui a pour conséquence le fait d’être doué de Ressenti. Elles construisent la Perception en tant que construction, ce qui a pour conséquence le fait d’être doué de Perception. Elles construisent les Fabrications en tant que fabrications, ce qui a pour conséquence le fait d’être doué de Fabrications. Elles construisent la Conscience en tant que construction, ce qui a pour conséquence le fait d’être doué de Conscience. C’est parce qu’elles construisent le construit, bhikkhous, qu’elles sont appelées ‘Fabrications’.

Kiñca, bhikkhave, viññāṇaṃ vadetha? Vijānātīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘viññāṇa’nti vuccati. Kiñca vijānāti? Ambilampi vijānāti, tittakampi vijānāti, kaṭukampi vijānāti, madhurampi vijānāti, khārikampi vijānāti, akhārikampi vijānāti, loṇikampi vijānāti, aloṇikampi vijānāti. Vijānātīti kho, bhikkhave, tasmā ‘viññāṇa’nti vuccati.

Et pourquoi, bhikkhous, l’appelez-vous Conscience? C’est parce qu’elle devient consciente, bhikkhous, qu’elle est appelée ‘Conscience’. Et de quoi devient-elle consciente? Elle devient consciente de ce qui est acide, elle devient consciente de ce qui est amer, elle devient consciente de ce qui est aigre, elle devient consciente de ce qui est sucré, elle devient consciente de ce qui est alcalin, elle devient consciente de ce qui est non-alcalin, devient consciente de ce qui est salé et devient consciente de ce qui est non-salé. C’est parce qu’elle devient consciente, bhikkhous, qu’elle est appelée Conscience.

L’une des principales difficultés qui me sont apparues est de comprendre la différence dans ces définitions entre Saññā et Viññāṇa. La première correspond à percevoir les différentes couleurs, et la seconde ‘devient consciente’ de ce qui est sucré, alcalin ou salé. L’explication que l’on trouve en général est la suivante:

Saññā effectue la reconnaissance en comparant l’information du présent avec celles du passé, alors que Viññāṇa prend connaissance de l’information brute du présent (ou du passé immédiatement précédent), non encore filtrée par Saññā.

Cependant, si l’on croyait avoir avancé avec ça, cette citation de MN 43 semble vouloir tout balayer:

– “yā cāvuso, vedanā yā ca saññā yañca viññāṇaṃ, ime dhammā saṃsaṭṭhā udāhu visaṃsaṭṭhā? labbhā ca panimesaṃ dhammānaṃ vinibbhujitvā vinibbhujitvā nānākaraṇaṃ paññāpetun”ti?

– Amie, en ce qui concerne le Ressenti, la Perception et la Conscience: ces phénomènes sont-ils conjoints ou disjoints? Est-il possible de les séparer les uns des autres et de mettre en évidence leurs différences?

– “yā cāvuso, vedanā yā ca saññā yañca viññāṇaṃ, ime dhammā saṃsaṭṭhā, no visaṃsaṭṭhā. na ca labbhā imesaṃ dhammānaṃ vinibbhujitvā vinibbhujitvā nānākaraṇaṃ paññāpetuṃ. yaṃ hāvuso, vedeti taṃ sañjānāti, yaṃ sañjānāti taṃ vijānāti. tasmā ime dhammā saṃsaṭṭhā no visaṃsaṭṭhā. na ca labbhā imesaṃ dhammānaṃ vinibbhujitvā vinibbhujitvā nānākaraṇaṃ paññāpetun”ti.
– Ami, en ce qui concerne le Ressenti, la Perception et la Conscience: ces phénomènes sont conjoints, et non pas disjoints, et il n’est pas possible de les séparer les uns des autres et de mettre en évidence leurs différences. Car ce qu’on ressent, ami, on le perçoit, et ce qu’on perçoit, on en est conscient. C’est pourquoi ces phénomènes sont conjoints, et non pas disjoints, et il n’est pas possible de les séparer les uns des autres et de mettre en évidence leurs différences.

Pendant longtemps, j’ai donc cru que pour vraiment comprendre ce que sont les accumulations d’attachement, il fallait forcément avoir développé la concentration jusqu’au quatrième jhāna:

SN 22.5

Bhikkhous, développez la concentration. Un bhikkhou qui est concentré comprend les choses telles qu’elles sont dans les faits. Et que comprend-il tel que c’est dans les faits? L’origine et la cessation de Rūpa, l’origine et la cessation de Vedanā, l’origine et la cessation de Saññā, l’origine et la cessation de Saṅkhāra, l’origine et la cessation de Viññāṇa.

Mais j’ai finalement eu mon moment d’ « eurêka! » et je me suis rendu compte au cours d’un discours sur le Dhamma donné dans un monastère au Sri Lanka, dont le thème n’était d’ailleurs pas directement lié aux khandhas, qu’il n’est en fait pas si difficile d’identifier les khandhas en soi-même, même pour un non-méditant. En fait, je me suis ensuite rendu compte que ma compréhension collait même assez bien avec SN 22.47, qui décrit comment une personne crée le Soi sur la base des cinq khandhas:

rūpaṃ attato samanupassati, rūpavantaṃ attānaṃ; attani rūpaṃ, rūpasmiṃ attānaṃ. vedanaṃ attato samanupassati vedanāvantaṃ vā attānaṃ attani vā vedanaṃ vedanāya vā attānaṃ; saññaṃ attato samanupassati saññāvantaṃ vā attānaṃ attani vā saññaṃ saññāya vā attānaṃ; saṅkhāre attato samanupassati saṅkhāravantaṃ vā attānaṃ attani vā saṅkhāre saṅkhāresu vā attānaṃ; viññāṇaṃ attato samanupassati viññāṇavantaṃ vā attānaṃ attani vā viññāṇaṃ viññāṇasmiṃ vā attānaṃ.

Il considère la Forme (i.e. le corps) comme étant Soi, ou bien que le Soi possède la Forme, ou que la Forme est dans le Soi, ou que le Soi est dans la Forme. Il considère le Ressenti comme étant Soi, ou bien que le Soi possède le Ressenti, ou que le Ressenti est dans le Soi, ou que le Soi est dans le Ressenti. Il considère la Perception comme étant Soi, ou bien que le Soi possède la Perception, ou que la Perception est dans le Soi, ou que le Soi est dans la Perception. Il considère les Constructions comme étant Soi, ou bien que le Soi possède les Constructions, ou que les Constructions sont dans le Soi, ou que le Soi est dans les Constructions. Il considère la Conscience comme étant Soi, ou bien que le Soi possède la Conscience, ou que la Conscience est dans le Soi, ou que le Soi est dans la Conscience.

Ainsi, il m’est apparu que les khandhas sont mieux compris comme des mécanismes dynamiques que comme des systèmes fixes qui seraient implantés en nous comme des cartes de composants électroniques dans un ordinateur. Voici donc ce qui m’est apparu. On pourra remarquer que le Bouddha mentionnait toujours les khandhas dans le même ordre, qui semble bien aller du plus facile à identifier vers le plus difficile et subtil.

Rūpa, la Forme, l’accumulation d’attachement la plus facile à comprendre, correspond au corps, et l’on comprend bien comment on peut s’y identifier, car le matérialisme est devenu profondément ancré dans notre culture, preuve en est le « philosophe » Michel Onfray, et nous avons tous fini par y sombrer à divers degrés. Il s’agit donc ici de croire à l’instar de notre ami qu’il y a un Soi qui est matériel, ou qui possède la matière, ou qui contient la matière, ou qui est contenu dans la matière.

Vedanā, le Ressenti, qui n’est somme toute pas si difficile que cela à identifier, se révèle lorsqu’on s’identifie aux ressentis qui apparaissent suite au contact avec les divers objets des sens. On se considère dans ces instants-là comme le sujet qui ressent le caractère agréable, désagréable ou neutre des expériences.

Saññā, la Perception, un peu plus subtile, se révèle lorsqu’on s’imagine être quelqu’un qui comprend une phrase, qui reconnaît un ami dans la foule, qui se souvient du passé, ou qu’on se persuade que les pensées qui passent dans l’esprit ont un auteur auquel on s’identifie.

Saṅkhārā, les Constructions, correspondent semble-t-il à un concept assez subtil, mais on peut en trouver des manisfestations relativement grossières dans la vie de tous les jours, lorsqu’on se persuade que les intentions, les volitions, les décisions qui sont prises par l’esprit sont les créations d’un décideur, ou que les actions sont les œuvres d’un ‘faiseur’. Pour ceux qui ont une expérience chez Goenka, il s’agit de l’identification avec quelqu’un qui déciderait d’obtenir davantage d’une sensation particulière, ou bien de vouloir se débarrasser d’une sensation désagréable, ou alors de tenter de rester équanime.

Viññāṇa, la Conscience, est certainement l’accumulation la plus difficile à appréhender. Comme l’explique MN 43, il est difficile de séparer clairement la Conscience de la Perception et du Ressenti et de donner un exemple où elle serait l’acteur prédominant, car elle fonctionne toujours en arrière-plan, en quelque sorte, comme la base sur laquelle se construit tout le reste de l’expérience, et on s’y identifie de manière plus subtile et donc plus difficilement identifiable. Si l’on entend un son, par exemple, il s’agit d’imaginer être quelqu’un qui perçoit les vibrations sonores, en ‘entendeur’.

J’espère que ces quelques considérations vous auront permis de clarifier un tant soit peu ces concepts qui sont si centraux dans l’enseignement du Bouddha, et pourtant si étrangers à notre culture et notre mode de pensée.

La tradition, une épée à double tranchant

Deuxième article recyclé:

On peut difficilement faire plus traditionnel que le bouddhisme Théravada. C’est d’ailleurs sa fidélité aux origines que la plupart de ceux qui l’adoptent par choix apprécient. Mais ce qu’il y a de particulier avec cette tradition, c’est qu’elle contient des invitations à se protéger contre elle-même. Malheureusement, ces invitations sont quasi complètement ignorées dans le Théravada religieux traditionnel.

L’une de ces mises en garde se trouve à MN 76:

Un certain enseignant est un traditionaliste, il considère sa tradition comme la vérité. Il enseigne un dhamma conforme à ce qu’il a entendu, à ce qu’on lui a transmis dogmatiquement, à ce qu’on lui a transmis dans une collection de textes. Mais lorsqu’un enseignant est un traditionaliste, Sandaka, qu’il considère sa tradition comme la vérité, certaines choses ont été bien transmises, d’autres ont été mal transmises, certaines sont vraies, d’autres sont fausses.

On trouve également le conseil suivant à AN 3.67:

Ecoute, Sāḷha, ne te laisse pas guider par ce que tu as entendu, ni par ce qui est répété dogmatiquement, ni par ce qui est communément admis, ni par ce qui est transmis par des écritures, ni par ce qui se fonde sur le raisonnement, ni par ce qui se fonde sur l’inférence, ni par des considérations sur les apparences, ni par l’acceptation d’une opinion après l’avoir méditée, ni par ce qui semble possible, ni [en pensant:] « ce renonçant est mon enseignant ».

Et de nouveau, à MN 95:

Certaines choses peuvent être acceptées par foi, et se révéler pourtant vides, creuses et fausses, tandis que d’autres peuvent ne pas être acceptées par foi, et se révéler pourtant factuelles, correctes et sans erreur. (…) Certaines choses peuvent avoir été bien apprises, et se révéler pourtant vides, creuses et fausses, tandis que d’autres peuvent ne pas avoir été bien apprises, et se révéler pourtant factuelles, correctes et sans erreur.

Et enfin, à DN 16:

Il est aussi possible qu’un bhikkhu dise: ‘A tel et tel endroit, il ya une communauté de bhikkhus qui sont des anciens, qui sont cultivés, qui ont fait leur chemin, qui préservent le Dhamma, le Vinaya, le Pātimokkha (…) il y a un bhikkhu qui est un ancien, qui est cultivé, qui a fait son chemin, qui préserve le Dhamma, le Vinaya, le Pātimokkha; j’ai reçu et appris cela de lui: « Ceci est le Dhamma, ceci est le Vinaya, ceci est l’enseignement du Maître »‘. Dans un tel cas, bhikkhus, vous ne devriez ni approuver ni désapprouver de ses paroles. Sans approuver ni désapprouver, mais en étudiant les phrases mot par mot, il faudrait essayer de les retrouver dans les suttas et les vérifier à la lumière du Vinaya. Si on ne les retrouve pas dans les suttas et qu’elles ne sont pas vérifiables à la lumière du Vinaya, il faut en conclure: ‘Certainement, cela n’est pas la parole du Bhagavā; elle a mal été comprise par cet ancien’. De cette manière, bhikkhus, vous devriez les rejeter. Mais si les phrases concernées peuvent être retrouvées dans les suttas et qu’elles sont vérifiables à la lumière du Vinaya, alors il faut en conclure: ‘Certainement, cela est la parole du Bhagavā; elle a été bien comprise par cet ancien’.

Les souttas nous poussent donc à garder toujours un esprit critique et à nous méfier des déclarations faites par les uns et par les autres. Il faut s’en référer à ces mêmes souttas pour prendre une décision. Certains principes tels que ceux décrits à AN 8.53 peuvent également être appliqués:

De ces choses, Gotami, dont tu saurais: ‘Ces choses mènent à la passion, pas à la dépassion; elles mènent à l’enchaînement, pas à la libération; elles mènent à l’accumulation, pas à la diminution; elles mènent à avoir beaucoup de désirs, pas à avoir peu de désirs; elles mènent à l’insatisfaction, pas à la satisfaction; elles mènent à la socialisation, pas à l’isolement; elles mènent à la paresse, pas à l’application de l’effort; elles mènent à être difficile à supporter, pas à être facile à supporter’, Gotami, tu peux assurément considérer: ‘Ce n’est pas le Dhamma, ce n’est pas le Vinaya, ce n’est pas l’instruction de l’Enseignant’.

De ces choses, Gotami, dont tu saurais: ‘Ces choses mènent à la dépassion, pas à la passion; elles mènent à la libération, pas à la l’enchaînement; elles mènent à la diminution, pas à l’accumulation; elles mènent à avoir peu de désirs, pas à avoir beaucoup de désirs; elles mènent à la satisfaction, pas à l’insatisfaction; elles mènent à l’isolement, pas à la socialisation; elles mènent à l’application de l’effort, pas à la paresse; elles mènent à être facile à supporter, pas à être difficile à supporter’, Gotami, tu peux assurément considérer: ‘C’est le Dhamma, c’est le Vinaya, c’est l’instruction de l’Enseignant’.

Lorsqu’on séjourne en Asie, on est tôt ou tard confronté à ce genre de problème. Certains acceptent la tradition en bloc. La plupart l’acceptent en blocs. Je veux dire qu’ils mettent certaines choses de côté mais ils acceptent toujours des blocs entiers sans les examiner au préalable au peigne fin.

En ce qui me concerne par exemple, j’applique le principe de DN 16 ci-dessus à l’Abhidhamma et je rejette presque l’intégralité en bloc, en tout cas tout ce qu’on ne peut pas corroborer avec les souttas. J’approche également le Visuddhimagga et les commentaires avec un oeil très critique. Ñāṇavīra disait que le fait d’ignorer les commentaires et autres textes tardifs compte comme un avantage puisque cela en fait d’autant moins à devoir désapprendre.

Evidemment en Asie il n’est pas facile d’expliquer tout cela aux locaux, qui s’abreuvent presque toujours de la parole de leur moine préféré sans même imaginer qu’ils sont censés ne l’apprécier que de manière critique. Le traditionalisme veut presque toujours s’imposer d’autorité et généralement rejette toute forme de questionnement critique.

Le résultat est qu’on trouve un grand nombre de bhikkhus qui préfèrent étudier l’Abhidhamma ou le Visuddhimagga tout en étant manifestement ignorants de mises en garde formulées expressément dans les souttas. Ou bien ils basent leur discours sur des histoires tirées des commentaires aux Jatakas ou au Dhammapada, histoires inventées par Buddhagosa (ou par d’autres) presque mille ans après le Bouddha et qui nous en disent pus sur la psychologie du commentateur que sur quoi que ce soit d’autre. C’est ce que j’appelle les discours sur le Dhamma de niveau histoire pour enfants. Et en faisant ainsi, ces moines réalisent la prophétie que l’on trouve à SN 20.7:

Dans le futur, bhikkhus, la même chose se produira avec les bhikkhus: lorsque ces discours qui sont la parole du Tathāgata, profonds, profonds dans leurs bienfaits, transcendants, [toujours] liés à la vacuité, seront récités, ils ne les écouteront pas attentivement, ils ne prêteront pas l’oreille, ils n’appliqueront pas leur esprit à la connaissance, ils ne considéreront pas ces enseignements comme devant être adoptés et maîtrisés.

Et lorsque ces discours qui sont qui sont des compositions littéraires faites par des poètes, des mots d’esprit, des lettres d’esprit, qui sont extérieurs [à ce Dhamma] ou qui sont les paroles de disciples seront récités, ils les écouteront attentivement, ils prêteront l’oreille, ils appliqueront leur esprit à la connaissance, ils considéreront ces enseignements comme devant être adoptés et maîtrisés.

La relation qu’il faut avoir avec la tradition et avec les traditionalistes est donc très délicate.